Troubleshoot Web pages

Files and links

ShowA hyperlink goes to the wrong destination.

ShowA hyperlink does not work.

This can be caused by one of the following:

  • The destination may have moved or may not exist any more      Verify the file exists by viewing the destination file with your Web browser if it is on the Internet, or with Microsoft Windows Explorer if it is on your hard drive or a network.
  • The text you believe is a hyperlink only looks like a hyperlink      Select the text, and then click Insert Hyperlink Button image to make sure the text is a hyperlink.
  • You may not have access to the destination      If the destination file is on the Internet, make sure you have a connection to the Internet. If the destination is on a network, contact your network administrator to ensure you have access to the destination file.

ShowI don't see hyperlink commands on the shortcut menu.

The Hyperlink shortcut menu (shortcut menu: A menu that shows a list of commands relevant to a particular item. To display a shortcut menu, right-click an item or press SHIFT+F10.) will not appear if the hyperlink display text contains a grammatical or spelling error and Microsoft Word is automatically checking for proofing errors. Text with spelling errors contains a red wavy underline; text with grammatical errors contains a green wavy underline.

After you accept or reject the proofing error, Word can display the Hyperlink shortcut menu. To do this, right-click the text that contains the underline, and then accept the suggested correction or click Ignore.

ShowI want to keep my supporting Web files in the same folder as my Web page.

When you save a Web page to a Web server, all supporting files — such as bullets, background textures, and graphics — are by default stored in a separate folder. If you want to save supporting files in the same folder as your Web page, do the following:

  1. On the Tools menu, click Options, and then click the General tab.
  2. Click Web Options, and then click the Files tab.
  3. Under File names and locations, clear the Organize supporting files in a folder check box.

 Note   Make sure when you move Web pages that you also move all supporting files and folders to the same location.

ShowMicrosoft Word doesn't automatically create a backup copy of my Web page.

When you save a Web page, a backup copy is not automatically created. To save a copy of a Web page:

  1. On the File menu, click Save As Web Page.
  2. In the File name box, enter a new name for the file, and then click Save.

ShowThe name of a supporting folder for a Web page is in another language.

By default, when you save your file as a Web page, all supporting files — such as bullets, background textures, and graphics — are organized in a supporting folder. The name of the supporting folder is the name of the Web page plus an underscore (_), a period (.), or a hyphen (-), and the word "files." For some language versions of Office, the word "files" is translated. For example, suppose you use the Dutch language version of Office to save a file named Page1 as a Web page. The default name of the supporting folder would be Page1_bestanden.

 Note   If you save your Web page with a short file name (maximum of eight characters, plus a three-character file extension) by clearing the Use long file names whenever possible check box in the Web Options dialog box, the supporting folder is the name of the Web page without the word "files."

ShowThe default name for the Web page supporting folder in each language version of Office

Language Default name for Web page supporting folder
Arabic .files
Basque _fitxategiak
Bulgarian .files
Catalan _fitxers
Chinese (Simplified) .files
Chinese (Traditional) .files
Croatian _datoteke
Czech _soubory
Danish -filer
Dutch _bestanden
English _files
Estonian _failid
Finnish _tiedostot
French _fichiers
German -Dateien
Greek .files
Hebrew .files
Hungarian _elemei
Italian -file
Japanese .files
Korean .files
Latvian _fails
Lithuanian _bylos
Norwegian -filer
Polish _pliki
Portuguese _ficheiros
Portuguese (Brazil) _arquivos
Romanian .files
Russian .files
Serbian (Cyrillic) .files
Serbian (Latin) _fajlovi
Slovakian .files
Slovenian _datoteke
Spanish _archivos
Swedish -filer
Thai .files
Turkish _dosyalar
Ukranian .files
Vietnamese .files

Authoring

ShowHTML tags on my Web page change after I open it and save it.

If the HTML (HTML: The standard markup language used for documents on the World Wide Web. HTML uses tags to indicate how Web browsers should display page elements such as text and graphics and how to respond to user actions.) source of a Web page appears to be different after you open a Web page and save it, here are some possible reasons:

  • If the former HTML tags in your file differed from standard HTML tags — for instance, if the tags were placed in a nonstandard order or used lowercase letters — Microsoft Word might have changed the tags to fit HTML standards when you closed the file. These changes generally won't affect the way that Word displays your Web page.
  • Word retains most HTML tags, even if the action a particular tag represents is not available in the Web page authoring environment.

ShowWhenever I edit a Web page, I have to confirm that Word is my default editor.

When you edit a Web document when using a browser such as Microsoft Internet Explorer, Microsoft Office checks whether Microsoft Word is registered as the default editor. If another program is registered as the default editor, Office displays a message asking whether you want to restore Word as your default editor. If you don't want Office to check your default editor, do the following:

  1. On the Tools menu, click Options, and then click the General tab.
  2. Click Web Options, and then click the Files tab.
  3. Under Default editor, clear the Check if Office is the default editor for Web pages created in Office check box.
  4. Clear the Check if Word is the default editor for all other Web pages check box.

ShowSome commands are not available.

Microsoft Word makes some commands unavailable when you open a Web page, create a new document based on a Web page template, choose to disable features not supported by Word 97, or save your document as a Word 6.0/95 document. The unavailable commands are not supported by the application you are creating the document for. For example, underline color is not available when you create Web pages, documents for Word 97, or documents for Word 6.0/95.

ShowThe HTML file that I want to edit opens in the wrong Microsoft Office application.

When you open an HTML (HTML: The standard markup language used for documents on the World Wide Web. HTML uses tags to indicate how Web browsers should display page elements such as text and graphics and how to respond to user actions.) or Single File Web Page (Single File Web Page (MHTML): An HTML document saved in MHTML format, which integrates inline graphics, applets, linked documents, and other supporting items referenced in the document.) file from the Open dialog box on the File menu, the file opens in the program the file was created in. For example, if you attempt to open an HTML format file in Microsoft PowerPoint that was created in Word, the file opens in Word instead. To open an HTML file in PowerPoint that was created in another Microsoft Office program, right-click the file in the Open dialog box, click Open With, and then click Microsoft PowerPoint on the shortcut menu.

 Note   For best results when you edit an HTML or MHTML file, open it in the program the file was created in.

ShowI saved my Web page to a file server, and now some people can't find or view it.

If you use a long file name to save your Web page to a file server, site visitors running Microsoft Windows 3.1 won't be able to find or open your Web page, because Windows 3.1 recognizes and supports only short file names (maximum of eight characters, plus a three-character file extension). To always save files with short file names, do the following:

  1. On the Tools menu, click Options.
  2. Click the General tab, and then click Web Options.
  3. Click the Files tab.
  4. Under File names and locations, clear the Use long file names whenever possible check box.

Viewing

ShowI see <HTML> or another tag instead of my Web page content.

If you see angle brackets and tags, such as <HTML>, <HEAD>, and <P>, instead of the content of your Web page, one of the following might be true:

ShowMy Web page displays the wrong characters for a language.

If a Web page is encoded (encoding: The byte (or sequence of bytes) representing each character in an HTML or plain text file. Unicode encoding supports all characters in all languages and is readable in at least Microsoft Internet Explorer 4 and at least Netscape Navigator 4.0.) for a different language, Microsoft Word tries to determine the language. If Word displays the wrong characters for that language when you open the page in a browser, you can select the language that you think the page is encoded in. Some languages have more than one encoding, so try each encoding until you can read the text.

  1. On the Tools menu, click Options, and then click the General tab.
  2. Click the Web Options button, and then click the Encoding tab.
  3. Under Reload the current document as, select the language you think the page is encoded in.

ShowI can't read the text on some Web pages.

Unexpected text characters might appear on a Web page for the following reasons:

ShowMy file looks different after I save it as a Web page.

When you save a document as a Web page, Microsoft Word displays the page as it will appear in a Web browser by converting the content and formatting to HTML (HTML: The standard markup language used for documents on the World Wide Web. HTML uses tags to indicate how Web browsers should display page elements such as text and graphics and how to respond to user actions.). Formatting and other items that aren't supported by HTML either are converted to the closest formatting or feature in HTML or are removed from the file.

Connecting

ShowI can't connect to the Internet.

You must have access to the Internet, either through a modem or through a network connection that provides Internet access.

Graphics

ShowI see a red X or blank image on my Web page where the graphic should be.

  • If you move or copy your Web page without moving the supporting files, or if you rename your graphics, any links to supporting files — such as bullets, background textures, and graphics — may be broken. To automatically update links when you save your Web page in Microsoft Word, on the Tools menu, click Options, and then click the General tab. Click Web Options, and then click the Files tab. Under File names and locations, select the Update links on save check box.
  • Check your browser settings, or consider testing in a different browser. Custom options can be set in browsers, such as the default text and background colors and whether or not graphics are displayed.
  • If you link a graphic to a Web page, and the graphic format isn't supported by your browser, your graphics won't be visible. Make sure that the linked picture is in a graphic format that is compatible with your browser. The .jpg and .gif graphic formats are compatible with most browsers.

ShowI saved my Web page, and now there are extra picture files in my supporting files folder.

ShowSome text and graphics are positioned differently when I save as a Web page.

Because Microsoft Word provides formatting options that most Web browsers do not support, some text and graphics may look different when you view them on a Web page. To use only formatting options supported by Web browsers, you can create a Web page from scratch or save your document as a Web page. When creating documents for the Web, you can use Web layout view (Web Layout view: A view of a document as it will appear in a Web browser. For example, the document appears as one long page (without page breaks) and text and tables wrap to fit in the window.) to ensure that your graphics look the way you want them to when they are viewed as Web pages in a Web browser.

If you have graphics with text wrapping      Graphics with certain kinds of text wrapping will change position when you save your document as a Web page.

If you need precise alignment of floating graphics and text      Use tables if your document requires precise alignment of text and graphics.

ShowAll of my graphics and objects change to GIF or JPEG format when I save as a Web page.

 
 
Applies to:
Word 2003