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Tables II: Table Tricks

Image showing what happens when Merge cells in checked

Selecting Merge cells before split produces different results.

You saw how easy it is to merge cells. Splitting cells is just as easy.

Splitting one cell is pretty straightforward. You just place your cursor in the cell you want split, click the Layout tab, and click Split. Then choose the number of columns and rows you want to split that cell into.

If you split more than one cell at a time, you will need to decide whether to check or clear the Merge cells before split check box. If you check Merge cells before split, Word merges the cells before dividing them. If you don't select the check box, Word splits each of the cells.

For example, if you select two cells, check Merge cells before split, and then select 3 for Number of columns, you will end up with three columns (cells) in the space where the two cells were. If you clear the check box, you will end up with six columns (cells) in the space where the two cells were.

Tip     The default number in the Number of columns box varies depending on whether Merge cells before split is selected. Determine whether you want the selected cells to merge before choosing the number of columns and rows you want.

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