Referencing cells in a table

When you perform calculations in a table, you reference table (table: One or more rows of cells commonly used to display numbers and other items for quick reference and analysis. Items in a table are organized into rows and columns.) cells (cell: A box formed by the intersection of a row and column in a worksheet or a table, in which you enter information.) as A1, A2, B1, B2, and so on, with the letter representing a column and the number representing a row. Cell references in Microsoft Word, unlike those in Microsoft Excel, are always absolute references (absolute cell reference: In a formula, the exact address of a cell, regardless of the position of the cell that contains the formula. An absolute cell reference takes the form $A$1.) and are not shown with dollar signs. For example, referring to a cell as A1 in Word is the same as referring to a cell as $A$1 in Excel.

Table illustrating cell references

ShowReference individual cells

To reference cells in formulas, use a comma to separate references to individual cells and a colon to separate the first and last cells in a designated range, as shown in the following examples.

To average these cells:

Table with cell range selected

=average(b:b) or =average(b1:b3)

Table with cell range selected

=average(a1:b2)

Table with cell range selected

=average(a1:c2) or =average(1:1,2:2)

Table with cell range selected

=average(a1,a3,c2)

ShowReference an entire row or column

You can reference an entire row or column in a calculation in the following ways:

  • Use a range that includes only the letter or number that represents it — for example, 1:1 to reference the first row in the table. This designation allows the calculation to automatically include all the cells in the row if you decide to add other cells later.
  • Use a range that includes the specific cells — for example, a1:a3 to reference a column with three rows. This designation allows the calculation to include only those particular cells. If you add other cells later and you want the calculation to include them, you need to edit the calculation.

ShowReference cells in another table

To reference cells in another table, or to reference a cell from outside a table, identify the table with a bookmark (bookmark: A location or selection of text in a file that you name for reference purposes. Bookmarks identify a location within your file that you can later refer or link to.). For example, the field { =average(Table2 b:b) } averages column B in the table marked by the bookmark Table2.

 
 
Applies to:
Word 2003