Best ways to get your Word document reviewed

Applies to
Microsoft Office Word 2003
Microsoft Word 2002

You have created a masterpiece in Microsoft Word. At least, you think it's a masterpiece. To really be sure, you need to make it available to peers or co-workers for review. There are many different ways you can use Word to share information with others. You can make your decision based on whom you want to share the information with and how you want the information to appear.

 Note   For more information about each feature described below, search the Help included with Word.

Sharing the entire document

Use one of these options when you want to share or collaborate on an entire document.

Let others review a document

To use this procedure, you must be using Microsoft Outlook®, Microsoft Outlook Express, Microsoft Exchange, or any 32-bit e-mail program compatible with the Messaging Application Programming Interface (MAPI).

  1. Open or switch to the document that you want to send for review.
  2. On the File menu, point to Send To, and then click Mail Recipient (for Review).
  3. In the To and Cc boxes, enter recipient names separated by semicolons.
    • To select recipient names from a list, click the To or Cc buttons.
    • By default, the file's name appears in the Subject box. If you want, you can type your own subject.

If the document is stored in a shared location, the e-mail message will contain a link to the file to be reviewed. If you send the document to a reviewer who might not have access to the shared location, click Yes when prompted to include the file.

Make information available in a public place

To make a document available in a public place, you can do one of the following:

  • Save it to a shared network location.
  • Save it to a Web site based on Microsoft Windows® SharePoint™ Services or SharePoint Team Services from Microsoft.
  • Store it on a discussion server.
  • Post it to a public folder on Microsoft Exchange Server.

Distribute a document in e-mail

To use this procedure, you must be using Microsoft Outlook, Microsoft Outlook Express, Microsoft Exchange, or any 32-bit e-mail program compatible with the Messaging Application Programming Interface (MAPI).

 Note   To send e-mail, you must have an e-mail account set up in your Outlook profile. You may have chosen not to add an e-mail account when you installed Outlook, or you may have canceled the new account wizard. After you set up an e-mail account, the Send button is available and you can send documents.

  1. Open or create the file that you want to send in e-mail as an attachment.
  2. On the File menu, point to Send To, and then click Mail Recipient (as Attachment).
  3. In the To and Cc boxes, enter recipient names separated by semicolons.
    • To select recipient names from a list, click the To or Cc buttons.
    • By default, the file's name appears in the Subject box. If you want, you can type your own subject.
  4. If you want, you can include an additional file.

Fax a document

If you don't have faxing capability on your computer, or if you don't want to tie up your telephone line while sending a fax, you can connect to faxing services on the Web with the Internet Fax Service (available in Word 2003 only) or the Fax Wizard.

If your computer supports faxing, you can also send faxes directly from your computer by using the Fax Wizard. On the File menu, point to Send To, and then click Recipient using a Fax Modem to open the Fax Wizard. Or, if you have Word 2003, you can click Recipient using Internet Fax Service.

Communicate and collaborate during an online meeting

  1. Open the document you want to share.
  2. On the Tools menu, point to Online Collaboration, and then click Schedule Meeting.

 Note   The first time you start a netmeeting, you will be prompted to enter your name and a directory server in the NetMeeting dialog box.

  1. Add the meeting participants in the To box, select the options you want for the meeting, and then click Send.

Sharing pieces of a document

Although Copy and Paste are good standbys, there are more ways to share information between files. Use one of the following features if you want to use parts of a document in another document.

If you want to do this Use this feature
Make a copy of information that appears in one program and paste it into another program. Microsoft Office Clipboard works with the standard Copy and Paste commands. Just copy an item to the Office Clipboard to add it to your collection, and then paste it from the Office Clipboard into any Office document. The collected items stay in the Office Clipboard until you exit Office.
Quickly copy or move information between two open files. Use drag-and-drop editing.
Create a jump to information in one program and represent it with colored and underlined text or a graphic. Create a hyperlink.
Copy information from another file and keep the copied information up to date if the original data changes in the source file. Use the Paste Special command (Edit menu), and then select the Paste link option to paste the copied information as a linked object.
Copy information from a file created in another program so that you can easily edit the data in the source program without leaving your current document. Use the Paste Special command (Edit menu) to paste the copied information as an embedded object.

Create a Microsoft PowerPoint presentation from a Word outline.

 Note   If your Word document includes tables or graphics, you will need to copy and paste them into PowerPoint.

Use the heading styles in your Word document to set up the slides in a presentation. For example, each paragraph formatted with the Heading 1 style becomes the title of a new slide, each Heading 2 becomes the first level of text, and so on.

  1. Open the document you want to use to create a PowerPoint presentation.
  2. On the File menu, point to Send To, and then click Microsoft Office PowerPoint.

 Note   In Word 2002, click Microsoft PowerPoint.

 
 
Applies to:
Word 2003