About ways to view a Word document

Microsoft Word has different ways for you to get a good view of your work, depending on the task at hand.

 Note   You can't set a default for all documents that you view in Word, because the view setting is stored with each individual document as a document property. You can save your document in the view with which you want it to open. Documents that you receive from others will open with the view in which they were previously saved.

ShowLayout views

Use layout views while you are working on your document.

ShowPrint Layout

Work in print layout view (Print Layout view: A view of a document or other object as it will appear when you print it. For example, items such as headers, footnotes, columns, and text boxes appear in their actual positions.) to see how text, graphics, and other elements will be positioned on the printed page.

Print layout view

This view is useful for editing headers and footers, for adjusting margins, and for working with columns and drawing objects. If you'd like to type and edit text in this view, you can save screen space by hiding white space at the top and bottom of the page.

To switch to print layout view, click Print Layout on the View menu.

ShowWeb Layout

Work in Web layout view (Web Layout view: A view of a document as it will appear in a Web browser. For example, the document appears as one long page (without page breaks) and text and tables wrap to fit in the window.) when you are creating a Web page or a document that is viewed on the screen.

Web layout view

In Web layout view, backgrounds are visible, text is wrapped to fit the window, and graphics are positioned just as they are in a Web browser.

To switch to Web layout view, click Web Layout on the View menu.

ShowNormal

ShowOutline

Work in outline view (outline view: A view that shows the headings of a document indented to represent their level in the document's structure. You can also use outline view to work with master documents.) to look at the structure of a document and to move, copy, and reorganize text by dragging headings.

Outline view

In outline view, you can collapse a document to see only the main headings, or you can expand it to see all headings and even body text.

Outline view also makes it easy to work with master documents (master document: A "container" for a set of separate files (or subdocuments). You can use a master document to set up and manage a multipart document, such as a book with several chapters.). A master document makes it easier to organize and maintain a long document, such as a multipart report or a book with chapters. In outline view, page boundaries, headers and footers, graphics, and backgrounds do not appear.

To switch to outline view, click Outline on the View menu.

ShowViewing modes

Use viewing modes when you want to read or move around in a document.

ShowReading Layout View

To read a document with a minimum of eye strain and with tools optimized for reading, use reading layout view (reading layout view: A view that is designed for reading documents on a computer screen. The document is resized to fit the screen and most toolbars are removed, but commands are available for navigating, commenting, and looking up words.).

Reading layout view is designed to make reading documents on the screen more comfortable. In this mode, Word removes distracting screen elements, such as extraneous toolbars. Word also uses your computer's screen resolution settings to size the document for optimum readability.

In reading layout view, you can use the Document Map (Document Map: A vertical pane along the left edge of the document window that displays an outline of the document's headings. You can use the Document Map to quickly move through a document and to keep track of your location in it.) or thumbnails to jump to different sections of the document, and you can use a task pane for reading-related activities, such as looking up or translating a word. If you want to edit the document, click where you want to make changes, and edit the document normally.

Reading layout view does not display the document the way the document is formatted for printing. Text may appear larger than expected, and the page breaks do not necessarily correspond to breaks between printed pages.

To switch to reading layout view, click Read Button image on the Standard toolbar or press ALT+R.

To turn off reading layout view, click Close Button image on the Reading Layout toolbar or press ALT+C.

ShowThumbnails

Thumbnails are small renderings of each page in your document, displayed in a separate pane (pane: A portion of the document window bounded by and separated from other portions by vertical or horizontal bars.). Thumbnails give you a visual impression of the content of each page. You can click a thumbnail image to jump directly to a page.

Thumbnails

Callout 1 Thumbnails pane

Callout 2 Document

Thumbnails are available in normal view (normal view: A view that shows text formatting and a simplified page layout. Normal view is convenient for most editing and formatting tasks.), print layout view (Print Layout view: A view of a document or other object as it will appear when you print it. For example, items such as headers, footnotes, columns, and text boxes appear in their actual positions.), outline view (outline view: A view that shows the headings of a document indented to represent their level in the document's structure. You can also use outline view to work with master documents.), and reading layout view (reading layout view: A view that is designed for reading documents on a computer screen. The document is resized to fit the screen and most toolbars are removed, but commands are available for navigating, commenting, and looking up words.). They are not available in Web layout view (Web Layout view: A view of a document as it will appear in a Web browser. For example, the document appears as one long page (without page breaks) and text and tables wrap to fit in the window.) or in conjunction with the Document Map (Document Map: A vertical pane along the left edge of the document window that displays an outline of the document's headings. You can use the Document Map to quickly move through a document and to keep track of your location in it.).

ShowDocument Map

The Document Map (Document Map: A vertical pane along the left edge of the document window that displays an outline of the document's headings. You can use the Document Map to quickly move through a document and to keep track of your location in it.) is a separate pane (pane: A portion of the document window bounded by and separated from other portions by vertical or horizontal bars.) that displays a list of headings in the document. Use the Document Map to quickly navigate through the document and keep track of your location in it.

A document with the Document Map displayed

Callout 1 Document Map pane

Callout 2 Document

When you click a heading in the Document Map, Word jumps to the corresponding heading in the document, displays it at the top of the window, and highlights the heading in the Document Map. You can show or hide the Document Map at any time.

To switch to the Document Map, click Document Map on the View menu.

ShowPreviews

Use previews to see what your document will look like in its published form.

ShowWeb Page Preview

In Web page preview (Web page preview: Displays the Web page in a Web browser.), you can see how your document will look in a Web browser. If your Web browser is not already running, Word starts it automatically. You can return to your document in Word at any time.

Web page preview

To switch to Web page preview, click Web Page Preview on the File menu.

ShowPrint Preview

How-to information     Find links to more information under See Also, which is visible when you are connected to the Internet.

 
 
Applies to:
Word 2003