Troubleshoot hyperlinks in Publisher

To solve several of the problems with using links in Microsoft Publisher, you need to add HTML code fragments to your Web publication. If you don't regularly work with HTML code, that can sound daunting. We provide the code that you need. All you have to do is modify that code for your specific situation.

 Note   These code samples were chosen specifically to solve problems that you face when you create Web sites in Publisher. They aren't suitable for all situations. If you are creating a complex Web site that you intend to update frequently or a site that includes interactive elements, consider using Microsoft FrontPage.

To add a code fragment to a Web publication, click the HTML Code Fragment command on the Insert menu. That opens the Edit HTML Code Fragment dialog box, where you can type or paste the code that you want to use.

Edit HTML Code Fragment dialog box

When you close the dialog box, a code fragment object is added to your Web page. The object looks something like the following.

Code fragment object

You can move the code fragment object around on the page the same way that you move other Publisher objects.

ShowI want the destination of a hyperlink to open in a new window.

To get the destination Web page or file of a hyperlink to open in a new window, you need to add an HTML code fragment to your Web publication. You can use either ECMAScript (JScript or JavaScript) or straight HTML code in that code fragment. Each approach has its advantages.

  • ECMAScript code    If you add more than one hyperlink on a page, use ECMAScript. With ECMAScript, you use the same code whether you apply the hyperlink to text or to a graphic, and you must create only one HTML code fragment object, no matter how many hyperlinks you need. You can move the HTML code fragment object out of the way because its only purpose is to contain the code. Also, when you use ECMAScript, you can control the size and appearance of the new window in which your destination opens.
  • HTML code    If you're even somewhat familiar with HTML code, you might be more comfortable with this approach. However, with HTML, each hyperlink that you add requires a unique HTML code fragment object. Also, you must integrate the HTML code fragment objects that you create into your Web page. When you use straight HTML code, you can't control the size or appearance of the new window in which your destination opens.

Whichever approach you choose, you don't have to write any code of your own. You can just copy the sample code provided in this article, paste it into the Edit HTML Code Fragment dialog box, and then modify the code features a bit (for example, change the URL in the sample to the URL of your destination Web page or file).

ShowThe ECMAScript code approach

Follow these steps to set up the hyperlink in your Web publication:

  1. In the Web publication where you want to add the hyperlink, on the Insert menu, click HTML Code Fragment.

The Edit HTML Code Fragment dialog box opens.

  1. Copy the following JavaScript code.
    <script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript"> <!-- function Show(Url, Name, Features) { window.open(Url, Name, Features); } // --> </script>
  2. In Publisher, select the placeholder text in the Edit HTML Code Fragment dialog box, and then paste the sample code into the dialog box. Click OK.

An HTML code fragment object appears in your publication. Drag it to a location where it won't be in the way when you want to work with the text on your page. The code fragment won't show up on your published page.

  1. Copy the following link.
    javascript:Show('http://www.fourthcoffee.com/ ', 'newwindow', 'toolbar=no,scrollbars=yes,resizable=yes,height=250,width=250')
  2. In your publication, select the text or picture that you want to link.
  3. On the Insert menu, click Hyperlink.
  4. In the Insert Hyperlink dialog box, paste the link that you just copied into the Address box.
  5. The link contains three sets of single quotation marks. To customize the path for your particular destination and window, you need to replace the text between each set of quotation marks (be sure not to delete the quotation marks):
    • First set of single quotation marks    Replace http://www.fourthcoffee.com/ with the URL of the Web page or the path of the file that you are linking to.

 Notes 

  • If you link to a file, the path depends on the location of the file in relation to the active page. For example, if you link from the home page to a file that is in the same directory on the Web server, the path can just be the file name (for example, Myfile.doc). If the file is in a different folder from the home page, the path must include the folder name (for example, index_files/Myfile.doc).
  • If you link to another page on your Web site, use this URL: index_files/Pagename.htm, where Pagename is the name of the page that you're linking to.

When you create a Web publication, Publisher assigns default names to the pages. For example, it assigns the name index.htm to the home page and names like Page572.htm or Page319.htm to the other pages. To find the name of a page, display the page. On the File menu, click Web Page Preview. In the browser window, look at the address for the page. The page name appears after the last backslash in the path. If you want the page names to be more meaningful than the default names (for example, NewsArticle.htm instead of Page572.htm), you can assign new names to pages in your Web publication.

  • Second set of single quotation marks    Text between these quotation marks assigns a name to the new window that opens when you click your hyperlink. You might want to name the window if you want several hyperlinks to open in the same window so that your customers don't have to close the window after they click each link. If you want to name the window that you're opening, leave the placeholder name (newwindow) where it is or type a name that you like better. If you don't want to name the window, delete newwindow but leave the two empty single quotation marks in place.
  • Third set of single quotation marks    Here, you specify the features that you want the new window to have. The code in the sample specifies that the new window will:
    • Have no toolbar.
    • Have scrollbars.
    • Be resizable.
    • Be 250 pixels tall and 250 pixels wide.

Replace those features with the features that you want your new window to have. The following table lists the features that you can use. Be sure to type a comma between each feature, but don't type a space.

 Note   If you just want the new window to open at the default restore size (not maximized) with all the regular menus and toolbars and status bar, delete all the features between the third set of single quotation marks, but leave the empty quotation marks in place.

Attribute What it does Possible values
menubar Specifies whether to display a menu bar at the top of the window yes or no
toolbar Specifies whether to display the main toolbar (with the buttons for back, forward, stop, and so on) yes or no
location Specifies whether to display the location bar (the Address Bar in Microsoft Internet Explorer) where URLs are typed and displayed yes or no
directories Specifies whether to display any additional toolbars (for example, the Links bar in Internet Explorer) yes or no
status Specifies whether to display the status bar at the bottom of the window yes or no
scrollbars Specifies whether to display the horizontal and vertical scrollbars that normally appear when the page content is larger than the screen yes or no
height Specifies the height of the window in pixels A number, such as 250
width Specifies the width of the window in pixels A number, such as 250
left In Internet Explorer, specifies the distance in pixels of the new window from the left edge of the screen (for Netscape Navigator, use screenx) A number, such as 0
top In Internet Explorer, specifies the distance in pixels of the new window from the top edge of the screen (for Netscape Navigator, use screeny) A number, such as 0
resizable When enabled, allows the user to manually resize the window by dragging its edges or corners yes or no
fullscreen When enabled, causes the window in Internet Explorer to open in full-screen mode yes or no
  1. When the link address is set up the way you want, click OK to close the Insert Hyperlink dialog box.
  2. To test your link, do one of the following:
    • If the link opens a Web page, click Web Page Preview on the File menu. When the preview page opens, click the link that you created.
    • If the link opens a file, you must publish your Web site to a local server. On the File menu, click Publish to the Web. If you see an information box about a Web hosting service, click OK. In the Publish to the Web dialog box, locate the local server where you want to test your Web site, and then click Save. Be sure to copy the external file that you're linking to up to the local server.

 Note   If you have multiple hyperlinks on a page, you still need to create only one HTML code fragment. Just make sure, for each hyperlink, that the link in the Address box of the Insert Hyperlink dialog box begins with javascript:Show( and ends with a closing parenthesis.

ShowThe HTML code approach

When you use HTML to make a hyperlink open in a new window, you must do the following:

  • Create a different code fragment for each hyperlink that you add.
  • Integrate the HTML code fragment objects that you create into the content of your Web page.

When using HTML, you don't use the Insert Hyperlink dialog box because the link information is included in the HTML code fragment.

ShowTo apply the hyperlink to text

  1. Copy the following code.
    <p >I want the destination of this link to open in a <a href="http://www.fourthcoffee.com/" target="_blank">new window</a>, not the same window.</p>
  2. In Publisher, display the Web page where you want to add the link.
  3. On the Insert menu, click HTML Code Fragment.

The Edit HTML Code Fragment dialog box opens.

  1. Select the placeholder text in the dialog box, and then paste the code that you copied into the dialog box. Now, modify the code features a bit to fit your particular situation.
  2. In the <a href="http://www.fourthcoffee.com/" target="_blank"> section of the code statement, replace the URL between the quotation marks (http://www.fourthcoffee.com/) with the URL or the path of the file that you want to link to. Be careful not to delete the quotation marks.

 Note   If you link to a file, the path depends on the location of that file in relation to the current page. For example, if you link from the home page to a file that is in the same directory on the Web server, the path can be the file name (for example, Myfile.doc). If the file is in a different folder from the home page, the path must include the folder name (for example, index_files/Myfile.doc).

  1. The <p > section of the code statement sets the font for the text in the HTML code fragment so that it matches the rest of the text on your page. Replace arial with the font that is applied to the text on the page. You may have to experiment a bit with font size. For regular body text, 70% or 80% will probably be right. To see the text size of the code fragment, click OK to close the Edit HTML Code Fragment dialog box, and then click Web Page Preview on the File menu.
  2. In the sample code,new window is the text that is linked. Replace new window with the text that you want the hyperlink applied to on your Web page.
  3. The text that precedes <a and follows </a> appears on your page in the same sentence as the hyperlinked text. Replace this sample text with your own text. Be careful to include a space before the <a and after the </a>. If the hyperlinked text stands alone and is not part of a sentence, just delete the text that precedes <a and follows </a>.
  4. When the code in the Edit HTML Code Fragment dialog box looks the way you want, click OK.

An HTML code fragment object appears in your publication. Drag it to the location on your page where you want the hyperlinked text to appear. You may have to experiment a bit to position the code fragment object so that the link appears exactly where you want it.

  1. To test your link, do one of the following:
    • If the link opens a Web page, click Web Page Preview on the File menu. When the preview page opens, click the link that you created.
    • If the link opens a file, you must publish your Web site to a local server. On the File menu, click Publish to the Web. If you see an information box about a Web hosting service, click OK. In the Publish to the Web dialog box, locate the local Web server where you want to test your Web site, and then click Save. Be sure to copy the external file that you're linking to up to the local server.

ShowTo apply the hyperlink to a picture

  1. Copy the following code.
    <a href="http://www.fourthcoffee.com/" target="_blank"> <img src="Picture.gif" alt="Explanatory note"></a>
  2. In Publisher, display the Web page where you want to add the link.
  3. On the Insert menu, click HTML Code Fragment.

The Edit HTML Code Fragment dialog box opens.

  1. Select the placeholder text in the dialog box, and then paste the code that you copied into the dialog box. Now, modify the code features a bit to fit your particular situation.
  2. In the <a href="http://www.fourthcoffee.com/" target="_blank"> section of the code statement, replace the URL between the quotation marks (http://www.fourthcoffee.com/) with the URL or the path of the file that you want to link to. Be careful not to delete the quotation marks.

 Note   If you link to a file, the path depends on the location of that file in relation to the active page. For example, if you link from the home page to a file that is in the same directory on the Web server, the path can be the file name (for example, Myfile.doc). If the file is in a different folder from the home page, the path must include the folder name (for example, index_files/Myfile.doc).

  1. In the <img src="Picture.gif" alt="Explanatory note"> section of the code, replace the picture file name between the quotation marks (Picture.gif) with the file name of the picture that you want to link. When you publish your Web site, make sure that you also upload the picture file. If you intend to put the picture file into a folder on the Web server, you must include the path as well as the file name in the code. For example, if you put the picture in a folder called index_files, the code looks like the following.
    <img src="index_files/Picture.gif">

Also, replace Explanatory note with alternative text that appears if the browser cannot display your picture.

  1. When the code in the Edit HTML Code Fragment dialog box looks the way you want, click OK.

An HTML code fragment object appears in your publication. Drag it to the location on your page where you want the hyperlinked picture to appear. You might have to experiment a bit to position the code fragment object so that the picture appears exactly where you want it.

  1. To test your link, it's best to publish your Web site to a local Web server. On the File menu, click Publish to the Web. If you see an information box about a Web hosting service, click OK. In the Publish to the Web dialog box, locate the local server where you want to test your Web site, and then click Save. Be sure to copy the picture file (for example, Picture.gif) to the appropriate location on the local server. And, if you're linking to an external file, copy that file to the local server.

ShowI want to link to another location on the same page.

To link to a location on the same Web page (sometimes called inserting a bookmark) in Publisher, you must add two HTML code fragments to the page:

  • The first code fragment creates an anchor in the location that you want to link to. For example, if you want to link to a section called "Additional Information," you must add HTML code that includes the text for the heading of that section and defines the text as an anchor by giving it a name, such as "additional."
  • The second code fragment creates the text or picture that links to the anchor.

 Note   Because each bookmark that you add to a Web page that you create in Publisher requires two HTML code fragment objects, you might want to consider creating complex sites by using FrontPage, which has tools for creating hyperlinks and bookmarks built in.

ShowAdd the HTML code fragment for the anchor

  1. Copy the following code.
    <p ><a name="additional">Additional Information</a></p>
  2. In Publisher, display the Web page where you want to add the anchor.
  3. On the Insert menu, click HTML Code Fragment.

The Edit HTML Code Fragment dialog box opens.

  1. Select the placeholder text in the dialog box, and then paste the code that you copied into the dialog box. Now, modify the code features a bit to fit your particular situation.
  2. The <p > part of the code statement sets the font for the text in the HTML code fragment so that it matches the rest of the text on your page. Replace arial with the font that is applied to the text on the page. You may have to experiment a bit with font size. For a heading, 100% will probably be right.

To see the text size of the code fragment, click OK to close the Edit HTML Code Fragment dialog box. On the File menu, click Web Page Preview.

 Note   You can also set the weight of the text in the HTML code fragment by adding a font-weight attribute to the paragraph style statement. For example, <p > makes the text appear bold.

  1. In the name="additional" part of the code statement, replace the name between the quotation marks with the name that you want to use for your anchor.
  2. In the Additional Information part of the code statement, replace this text with text on your Web page that you're linking to.

 Note   The text that you add to the HTML code fragment will show up on your published page, so you may need to delete text that's already on the page. For example, if your page already includes an "Additional Information" heading and you add a code fragment for an anchor that also includes the text Additional Information, that heading will show up twice on your published page unless you delete the original heading.

  1. When the code in the Edit HTML Code Fragment dialog box looks the way you want, click OK.

An HTML code fragment object appears in your publication. Drag it to the location on your page where you want the text in the code fragment to appear. You might have to experiment a bit to position the code fragment object so that the text appears exactly where you want it. You can change the shape and size of the HTML code fragment object by dragging the object's round handles.

 Note   To see how the code fragment text looks on the page, click Web Page Preview on the File menu.

ShowAdd the HTML code fragment for the link

The code that you use for the link depends on whether you are adding the link to text or to a picture.

ShowAdd the link to text

  1. Copy the following code.
    <p >You might want to read <a href="#additional">Additional Information</a> for more enlightment.</p>
  2. In Publisher, display the Web page where you want to add the link.
  3. On the Insert menu, click HTML Code Fragment.

The Edit HTML Code Fragment dialog box opens.

  1. Select the placeholder text in the dialog box, and then paste the code that you copied into the dialog box. Now, modify the code features a bit to fit your particular situation.
  2. The <p > part of the code statement sets the font for the text in the HTML code fragment so that it matches the rest of the text on your page. Replace arial with the font that is applied to the text on the page. You may have to experiment a bit with font size. For body text, 70% or 80% will probably be right.

To see the text size of the code fragment, click OK to close the Edit HTML Code Fragment dialog box. On the File menu, click Web Page Preview.

 Note   You can also set the weight of the text in the HTML code fragment by adding a font-weight attribute to the paragraph style statement. For example, <p > makes the text appear bold.

  1. In the <a href="#additional"> section of the code statement, replace additional with the name that you chose for your anchor. Make sure that you don't delete the number sign (#).
  2. In the sample code, Additional Information is the text that is linked. Replace it with the text that you want the hyperlink applied to on your Web page.
  3. The text that precedes <a and follows </a> is text that appears on your page in the same sentence as the hyperlinked text. Replace this sample text with your own text. Be careful to include a space before the <a and after the </a>. If the hyperlinked text stands alone and is not part of a sentence, just delete the text that precedes <a and follows </a>.
  4. When the code in the Edit HTML Code Fragment dialog box looks the way you want, click OK.

An HTML code fragment object appears in your publication. Drag it to the location on your page where you want the hyperlink to appear. You might have to experiment a bit to position the code fragment object so that the text appears exactly where you want it.

 Note   You can change the shape and size of the HTML code fragment object by dragging the object's round handles.

ShowAdd the link to a picture

  1. Copy the following code.
    <a href="#additional"> <img src="Picture.gif" alt="Explanatory note"></a>
  2. In Publisher, display the Web page where you want to add the link.
  3. On the Insert menu, click HTML Code Fragment.

The Edit HTML Code Fragment dialog box opens.

  1. Select the placeholder text in the dialog box, and then paste the code that you copied into the dialog box. Now, modify the code features a bit to fit your particular situation.
  2. In the <a href="#additional"> section of the code statement, replace additional with the name that you chose for your anchor. Make sure that you don't delete the number sign (#).
  3. In the <img src="Picture.gif" alt="Explanatory note"> section of the code, replace the picture file name between the quotation marks (Picture.gif) with the file name of the picture that you want to link. When you publish your Web site, make sure that you also upload the picture file. If you intend to put the picture file into a folder on the Web server, you must include the path as well as the file name in the code. For example, if you put the picture in a folder called index_files, the code looks like the following.
    <img src="index_files/Picture.gif">
Also, replace Explanatory note with alternative text that appears if the browser cannot display your picture.
  1. When the code in the Edit HTML Code Fragment dialog box looks the way you want, click OK.

An HTML code fragment object appears in your publication. Drag it to the location on your page where you want the hyperlinked picture to appear. You might have to experiment a bit to position the code fragment object so that the picture appears exactly where you want.

To test the link after you set up both HTML code fragments, click Web Page Preview on the File menu. When the preview page opens, click the hyperlinked text or picture. In the preview, the hyperlinked picture looks like a box with a red x in it. Don't worry. The hyperlink will still work fine, and the picture will show up when you publish your Web publication and upload the picture file to the server.

ShowI want to put a link at the bottom of a Web page that jumps to the top of the page.

To insert a hyperlink at the bottom of a page that jumps to the top of the page, you must add an HTML code fragment to your Web page.

  1. Copy the following code.
    <p ><a href="#top">back to top</a></p>
  2. In Publisher, display the Web page where you want to add the link.
  3. On the Insert menu, click HTML Code Fragment.

The Edit HTML Code Fragment dialog box opens.

  1. Select the placeholder text in the dialog box, and then paste the code that you copied into the dialog box. Now, modify the code features a bit to fit your particular situation.
  2. The <p > part of the code statement sets the font for the text in the HTML code fragment so that it matches the rest of the text on your page. Replace arial with the font applied to the text on the page. You may have to experiment a bit with font size. For body text, 70% or 80% will probably be about right.

To see the text size of the code fragment, click OK to close the Edit HTML Code Fragment dialog box. On the File menu, click Web Page Preview.

 Note   You can also set weight of the text in the HTML code fragment by adding a font-weight attribute to the paragraph style statement. For example, <p > makes the text appear bold.

  1. The hyperlink is applied to the back to top text. If you want the link to say something different, replace back to top with the text that you want.
  2. When the code in the Edit HTML Code Fragment dialog box looks the way you want, click OK.

An HTML code fragment object appears in your publication. Drag it to the location on your page where you want the hyperlink to appear. You might have to experiment a bit to position the code fragment object so that the link text appears exactly where you want.

ShowHyperlinks don't work.

  • If many of the hyperlinks don't work, some of your files may not have been published. By default, when you publish a Web site, Publisher uploads a subfolder called index_files. This folder contains all the files associated with your Web site except for the first page of the publication (the Web site home page). If you use a third-party program to upload your Web site, the subfolder may not get automatically uploaded to the Web server. If the folder isn't available, hyperlinks to other pages in your publication won't work.

 Note   You can set up Publisher so that it doesn't create the index_files folder. In your Web publication, on the Tools menu, click Options, and then click the Web tab. Clear the Organize supporting folders in a separate folder check box, and then click OK. Now when you publish your Web site, all the files are at the same level on the Web server.

  • If a specific hyperlink doesn't work, check for the following:
    • The destination might have moved or might not exist any more    Verify that the file exists. If the destination file is on the Internet, search for it in your Web browser. If the file is on your hard disk or a network, search for it in Microsoft Windows Explorer.
    • The text that you believe is a hyperlink only looks like a hyperlink    Select the text and click Insert Hyperlink Button image to make sure that the text is a hyperlink.
    • You may not have access to the destination    If the destination file is on the Internet, make sure that you have a connection to the Internet. If the destination is on a network, contact your network administrator to ensure that you have access to the destination file.

ShowHyperlinks to external files don't work.

When you create a hyperlink on a Web page that opens an external file, such as a Microsoft Word document, Microsoft Excel spreadsheet, or a PDF file, keep the following in mind:

  • Ideally, file names for external files that you link to should not include spaces and should be in lowercase letters.

 Note   If you link to a file that has a space in its name and you can't change the name, you can replace the space in the hyperlink address with %20. For example, if the file name is My File.doc, type My%20File.doc in the hyperlink address.

  • You can't test a link to an external file in Web preview. You have to publish the Web site to test the link. For testing purposes, you can publish a Web site to a local server. On the File menu, click Publish to the Web. If you see an information box about a Web hosting service, click OK. In the Publish to the Web dialog box, locate the local server where you want to test your Web site, and then click Save. Be sure to copy the external file that you're linking to up to the local server as well.
  • When you publish your Web site, you must upload the external file manually. Publisher won't upload it for you. Where you place the external file on the Web server determines the path. For example:
    • If you're linking from the home page to a file that is in the same directory on the Web server, the path can just be the file name (for example, Myfile.doc).
    • If the file is in a different folder from the home page, the path must include the folder name (for example, index_files/Myfile.doc).

You have to determine this path and type it in the Insert Hyperlink dialog box before you publish to the Web. Select the text or picture that you want visitors to your page to click to open the external file. On the Insert menu, click Hyperlink. In the Insert Hyperlink dialog box, in the Address box, type the path to the external file.

  • If you insert the hyperlink by browsing to the external file on your computer, Publisher inserts a path that looks like this: C:\My Documents\Myfile.doc. This path won't mean anything after you publish your Web site, so you have to change the path. Do one of the following:
    • If the file will be in the same folder on the Web server as the page that you're linking from, type the external file name (for example, Myfile.doc).
    • If the file will be in a different folder on the Web server from the page that you're linking from, type the folder name, a forward slash, and the external file name (for example, index_files/Myfile.doc).

ShowThe link path is on my hard drive, not on my Web site.

If you insert a hyperlink by browsing to an external file on your computer, Publisher inserts a path to the external file that looks like this: C:\My Documents\Myfile.doc. This path won't mean anything after you publish your Web site, so you have to manually change the path in the publication before you publish the site. To change the path:

  1. Select the text or picture that you linked to the external file.
  2. On the Insert menu, click Hyperlink.
  3. In the Edit Hyperlink dialog box, select the existing path in the Address box and then do one of the following:
    • If the file will be in the same folder on the Web server as the page that you're linking from, type the external file name, such as Myfile.doc.
    • If the file will be in a different folder on the Web server from the page that you're linking from, type the folder name, a forward slash, and the external file name (for example, index_files/Myfile.doc).

ShowI don't want my hyperlinked text to be underlined.

You can remove underlining for all the links on a page in a Publisher Web publication by using an HTML code fragment.

 Note   An HTML code fragment works on a page rather than on an entire publication. You must add identical HTML code fragments to all the publication pages where you want to remove underlining.

Here's how to add the appropriate HTML code fragment to a page:

  1. Display a page in the Web publication where you want to remove underlining.
  2. On the Insert menu, click HTML Code Fragment.

The Edit HTML Code Fragment dialog box opens.

  1. Copy the following code.
    <style>a{text-decoration:none}</style>
  2. In Publisher, select the placeholder text in the Edit HTML Code Fragment dialog box, and then paste the code that you copied into the dialog box.
  3. Click OK to close the dialog box.

An HTML code fragment object appears in your publication. Drag it to a location where it's out of the way. The code fragment won't show up on your published page.

  1. To check the appearance of your hyperlinks, click Web Page Preview on the File menu.

ShowA hyperlink does not appear.

This can be caused by one of the following:

The hyperlink is located in a rotated text box or AutoShape    In a Web publication, hyperlinks will not function properly if they are located in rotated text boxes or AutoShapes (AutoShapes: A group of ready-made shapes that includes basic shapes, such as rectangles and circles, plus a variety of lines and connectors, block arrows, flowchart symbols, stars and banners, and callouts.). You can restore the hyperlinks in your Web publication by returning the rotated text boxes or AutoShapes that contain hyperlinks to their original position.

The hyperlink is located in a text box or AutoShape with BorderArt    In a Web publication, hyperlinks will not function properly if they are located in a text box or AutoShape with BorderArt. You can restore the hyperlinks in your Web publication by removing any BorderArt from the text boxes or AutoShapes that contain hyperlinks.

 
 
Applies to:
Publisher 2003