Add and play a movie in a presentation

In this article


Overview of movies and animated GIF files

Movies are desktop video files with formats such as AVI or MPEG and file extensions such as .avi, .mov, .mpg, and .mpeg. A typical movie can include a speaker talking, such as an executive who cannot attend the actual presentation. You can use a movie to train others or to perform a demonstration.

An animated GIF (GIF: A graphics file format (.gif extension in Windows) used to display indexed-color graphics on the World Wide Web. It supports up to 256 colors and uses lossless compression, meaning that no image data is lost when the file is compressed.) file includes motion and has a .gif file extension. Though not technically movies, animated GIF files contain multiple images that stream to create an animation effect. They are often used to accent a design or Web site. GIF files are categorized as movie clips by the Clip Art feature in Microsoft Office but are not actually digital video, so not all movie options are available for animated GIF files.

You can add movies and animated GIF files to slides from files on your computer, the Microsoft Clip Organizer, a network, or an intranet. To add the movie or animated GIF file, you insert it onto the specific slide. There are several ways you can start the movie or GIF file: have it play automatically when the slide is displayed, click it, or create a timing for it so that it plays after a certain delay. You can also keep a movie playing over several slides or have it play continuously throughout your presentation. You can also set movie options, such as hiding the movie frame or resizing it.

Unlike pictures or drawings, movie files are always linked (linked object: An object that is created in a source file and inserted into a destination file, while maintaining a connection between the two files. The linked object in the destination file can be updated when the source file is updated.) to your presentation, rather than embedded (embedded object: Information (object) contained in a source file and inserted into a destination file. Once embedded, the object becomes part of the destination file. Changes you make to the embedded object are reflected in the destination file.) in it. When you insert a linked movie file, PowerPoint creates a link to the movie file's current location. If you later move the movie file to a different location, PowerPoint cannot locate it when you want the file to play. It is a good practice to copy the movies into the same folder as your presentation before you insert the movies. PowerPoint creates a link to the movie file and can find the movie file as long as you keep it in the presentation folder, even if you move or copy the folder to another computer. Another way to be sure that your linked files are in the same folder as your presentation is to use the Package for CD feature. This feature copies all the files to one location (a CD or folder) with your presentation and automatically updates all the links for the movie files. When your presentation contains linked files, you must copy the linked files as well as the presentation if you plan to give the presentation on another computer or send it to someone in e-mail.

When you insert a movie, a pause trigger effect is added. This setting is known as a trigger because you have to click something in the slide to play the movie. In a presentation, you click the movie frame to pause the movie and click it again to resume it.

How the play and pause effects work with movies that start automatically

When you insert a movie and then select Automatically, two effects are added to the Custom Animation task pane (task pane: A window within an Office program that provides commonly used commands. Its location and small size allow you to use these commands while still working on your files.): a pause effect and a play effect. Without the pause effect, the movie would restart from the beginning each time you clicked it, instead of pausing and then continuing when you clicked again.

After you insert a movie, you see something similar to the following image in the Custom Animation task pane.

Movie effects in task pane list

In this image, the first line (with a "0") is the play effect. It represents the automatic start. The clock icon is the symbol for the start setting called Start After Previous. This setting enables your movie to play automatically after the slide is displayed or after another effect plays (if there is one). The triangle icon (similar to the symbol on the play button of a VCR or DVD player) is the indicator for the play effect.

The second line is the trigger bar, and below that (the line with a "1") is the pause effect. You see a mouse icon and a double-bar symbol (similar to the symbol on the pause button of a VCR or DVD player). This effect is added whether the movie starts automatically or by a mouse click. Its position under the trigger bar indicates that you have to click the movie (as opposed to clicking anywhere on the slide) to start the movie.

How the pause effect works with movies that start when clicked

After you insert a movie, you see something similar to the following image in the Custom Animation task pane.

Movie effect in task pane list

Unlike what happens when you choose to start a movie automatically, the only effect that is applied when you choose to start the movie by clicking it is the pause effect — the line with the mouse icon and the double-bar (pause) symbol.

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Add a movie

To prevent possible problems with links, it is a good idea to copy the movies into the same folder as your presentation before you add the movies to your presentation.

  1. In Normal view, click the slide to which you want to add a movie or animated GIF file.
  2. On the Insert tab, in the Media Clips group, click the arrow under Movie.

Insert tab image

  1. Do one of the following:

 Tip   You can preview a clip before you add it to your presentation. In the Clip Art task pane, in the Results box that displays the available clips, move your mouse pointer over the clip's thumbnail, click the arrow that appears, and then click Preview/Properties.

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Choose between Automatically or When Clicked

When you insert a movie, you are prompted with a message asking how you want the movie to start: automatically (Automatically) or when you click the movie (When Clicked).

  • To automatically start the movie when you show the slide, click Automatically. You can pause a movie while it is playing by clicking it. To continue playing the movie, click it again.
  • To manually start the movie when you click it on the slide, click When Clicked.

When you insert a movie, a pause trigger effect is added. It's called a trigger because you have to click something specific within the slide to play the movie. For example, in a presentation, you click the movie frame to pause the movie and click it again to resume playing it.

 Note   You can change this option at any time. Click the movie, and then under Movie Tools, click the Options tab. In the Movie Options group, select the option that you want from the Play Movie list.

Movie Tools Options tab

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Play a movie full screen

You can play a movie so that it fills up the entire screen when you are giving your presentation, instead of playing it as part of a slide in your presentation. This is called playing a movie full screen. Depending on the resolution of your original movie file, it might appear distorted when it is enlarged. You will always want to preview your movie, so that if the movie appears distorted or blurry, you can undo the full screen option. Generally, a small movie that is set to play full screen will not look good when it is enlarged.

If you set the movie to be displayed full screen and it is also set to start automatically, you can drag the movie frame off the slide into the gray area so that it will not be visible on the slide or flash briefly before the movie goes to full screen.

  1. In Normal view, click the movie frame on the slide that you want to play full screen.
  2. Under Movie Tools, on the Options tab, in the Movie Options group, select the Play Full Screen check box.

Movie Tools Options tab

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Preview a movie

  • In Normal view, click the movie frame on the slide that you want to preview.
  • Under Movie Tools, on the Options tab, in the Play group, click Preview.

Movie Tools Options tab

Tips    

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Play a movie across several slides

You may want the movie that you inserted in a presentation to continue to play when you advance to the next slide. To do this, you need to specify when the movie should stop playing. Otherwise, it will stop the next time that you click the mouse.

 Note   You must have a play effect to do the following procedure. If you already inserted the movie and chose When Clicked when prompted, you can switch to Automatically to add a play effect.

Switch from When Clicked to Automatically

  1. In Normal view, click the movie.
  2. Under Movie Tools, on the Options tab, in the Movie Options group, in the Play Movie list, click Automatically.

Movie Tools Options tab

Keep the movie playing across slides

 Note   This procedure plays the movie once for the length of the movie file. It does not play the movie repeatedly.

  1. In Normal view, click the movie frame on the slide.
  2. Under Movie Tools, on the Options tab, in the Movie Options group, in the Play Movie list, click Play across slides.

Movie Tools Options tab

  1. On the Animations tab, in the Animations group, click Custom Animation.

Animations tab image

  1. In the Custom Animation task pane (task pane: A window within an Office program that provides commonly used commands. Its location and small size allow you to use these commands while still working on your files.), click the line that represents the movie play effect (the line with the triangle), click the arrow, and then click Effect Options.
  2. To keep the movie playing for several slides, under Stop playing, click After, and then set the total number of slides that the file should play across.

 Tip   If you set this value to 999 (the maximum), and the movie is long enough, it will play for the entire presentation, and you won't need to adjust the value if you add or delete slides from your presentation.

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Play a movie continuously throughout a presentation

You may want a movie to play for the duration of a presentation or to keep playing until you stop it. If the length of the movie is shorter than the length of the presentation, you can set the movie to start again after it finishes, so that some portion of the movie is always playing during your presentation.

  1. In Normal view, click the movie frame on the slide.
  2. Under Movie Tools, on the Options tab, in the Movie Options group, select the Loop Until Stopped check box.

Movie Tools Options tab

 Tip   When you loop a movie, it plays repeatedly until you click it. You can also play a movie across multiple slides.

 Notes 

Portions of this article were excerpted from Training on Microsoft Office Online.

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Applies to:
PowerPoint 2007