Troubleshoot e-mail security

Missing attachments

ShowI see a paper clip icon next to a message, but when I open it, the attachment is gone.

You may have received a message that contains a Level 1 e-mail security attachment file type. To help prevent the inadvertent spread of viruses, Microsoft Outlook compares the file type of each attachment in a received message with the file types on the e-mail security attachment file type list. If an attachment is a file type that can contain code that can run automatically without your consent, you cannot see or access the attachment.

Check the InfoBar (InfoBar: Banner near the top of an open e-mail message, appointment, contact, or task. Tells you if a message has been replied to or forwarded, along with the online status of a contact who is using Instant Messaging, and so on.) at the top of the message to see the name of the file attachment you are unable to access.

ShowMy attachment is missing.

You have received a message that contains a Level 1 e-mail security attachment file type. To help prevent the inadvertent spread of viruses, Microsoft Outlook compares the file type of each attachment in a received message with the file types on the e-mail security attachment file type list. If the attachment is a file type that can contain code that can run automatically without your consent, you cannot see or access the attachment.

Check the InfoBar (InfoBar: Banner near the top of an open e-mail message, appointment, contact, or task. Tells you if a message has been replied to or forwarded, along with the online status of a contact who is using Instant Messaging, and so on.) at the top of the message to see the name of the file attachment you are unable to access.

 Note   If you created a custom form that included a Level 1 file type in the message body, your attachment will not be visible once you save and close the form. The InfoBar will not show the name of the blocked file attachment because custom forms do not display the InfoBar.

ShowThe shortcut I sent to others has disappeared from their messages.

Shortcuts with a file extension of .lnk or .url are Level 1 e-mail security attachment file types. To help prevent the inadvertent spread of viruses, Microsoft Outlook compares the file type of each attachment in a message you send with the Level 1 file types on the e-mail security attachment file type list. If the attachment file type is Level 1, recipients cannot see or access the attachment. Recipients can verify that this is why they are not seeing the shortcut by checking the message's InfoBar (InfoBar: Banner near the top of an open e-mail message, appointment, contact, or task. Tells you if a message has been replied to or forwarded, along with the online status of a contact who is using Instant Messaging, and so on.) to see if it displays the name of your shortcut. You can then send them a message with a text link instead of the shortcut.

Unavailable menu commands

ShowThe View Attachments command on the shortcut menu is unavailable.

You have received a message that contains a Level 1 e-mail security attachment file type. To help prevent the inadvertent spread of viruses, Microsoft Outlook compares the file type of each attachment in a received message with the file types on the e-mail security attachment file type list. If the attachment is a file type that can contain code that can run automatically without your consent, you cannot access the attachment. The InfoBar (InfoBar: Banner near the top of an open e-mail message, appointment, contact, or task. Tells you if a message has been replied to or forwarded, along with the online status of a contact who is using Instant Messaging, and so on.) will display the name of the file attachment you are unable to access.

ShowThe Save Attachments command on the File menu is unavailable.

You have received a message that contains a Level 1 e-mail security attachment file type. To help prevent the inadvertent spread of viruses, Microsoft Outlook compares the file type of each attachment in a received message with the file types on the e-mail security attachment file type list. If the attachment is a file type that can contain code that can be run automatically without your consent, you cannot access the attachment. The InfoBar (InfoBar: Banner near the top of an open e-mail message, appointment, contact, or task. Tells you if a message has been replied to or forwarded, along with the online status of a contact who is using Instant Messaging, and so on.) will display the name of the file attachment you are unable to access.

Encrypting and digitally signing messages

ShowI can't send an encrypted message.

You might not have the intended recipient's certificate (certificate: A digital means of proving your identity. When you send a digitally signed message you are sending your certificate and public key. Certificates are issued by a certification authority, and like a driver's license, can expire or be revoked.) (public key (public key: The key a sender gives to a recipient so that the recipient can verify the sender's signature and confirm that the message was not altered. Recipients also use the public key to encrypt (lock) e-mail messages to the sender.)). Ask the recipient to send you a digitally signed message, and then add their certificate to Contacts.

ShowHow?

  1. Open a message that has been signed.
  2. Right-click the name in the From box, and then click Add to Outlook Contacts on the shortcut menu.
  3. If you already have an entry for this person, click Update new information from this contact to the existing one.

The certificate is now stored with your contact entry for this recipient.

To view the certificates for a contact, in Contacts, double-click the person's name, and then click the Certificates tab.

ShowThe digital signature on a message I received is not valid and not trusted.

ShowMy message format changed when I sent a digitally signed message.

If you are using Rich Text Format for messages, and you send a digitally signed message, the message format is changed to HTML to help ensure correct processing of the security code. Some formatting may be lost in the conversion.

ShowI receive a message when I try to send encrypted or digitally signed e-mail.

  • If you receive the message: "The Security Policy you selected does not allow one of the certificates in this security profile to be used," it means that the certificate in your default security settings has expired or has otherwise become invalid, or that your security policy does not accept your certificate. If you have set your security options to use labels on every message you send, the automatic configuration will not automatically notify you that your certificate has become invalid. To makes sure that the automatic configuration notifies you of problems with your default certificates, on the Tools menu, click Options, and then click the Security tab. Click Settings, and then click Security Labels. In the Policy module list, click None. If your security system does not allow you to choose None, contact your system administrator to get the correct certificates for your system.
  • If you receive the message: "Microsoft Outlook had problems encrypting this message because the following recipients had missing or invalid certificates, or conflicting or unsupported encryption capabilities," the most common cause is that you tried to send encrypted messages without having a copy of a valid certificate (certificate: A digital means of proving your identity. When you send a digitally signed message you are sending your certificate and public key. Certificates are issued by a certification authority, and like a driver's license, can expire or be revoked.) for the recipient. If you have multiple contacts for the recipient, you must send a message using the contact that has the certificate.

ShowI sent a message with an S/MIME receipt request but received no return receipt.

ShowMy security label settings have disappeared from Microsoft Outlook.

ShowThe security label settings aren't available.

ShowI can't publish my certificates to the Global Address List.

ShowI can't send an S/MIME receipt request.

ShowRecipients of my labeled messages can't open the message.

Other

ShowI'm having problems synchronizing my Handheld PC or cell phone.

When you synchronize your Handheld PC, mobile phone, or other device, you will be prompted to allow the program to access your Address Book (Address Book: The collection of address books that you can use to store names, e-mail addresses, fax numbers, and distribution lists. The Address Book may contain a Global Address List, an Outlook Address Book, and a Personal Address Book.) and contacts. Because viruses can spread by sending copies of e-mail messages to people listed in your Address Book, Microsoft Outlook e-mail security prevents programs from programmatically accessing your Address Book and contacts. Before the synchronization can continue, you must allow access to your Address Book. You can allow unsecured access for a specific instance (such as for one contact) or for a specified time period of up to 10 minutes.

You may also receive error messages while synchronizing or when sending e-mail from some Handheld PCs.

ShowNone of the Microsoft ActiveX Controls, Java applets, or scripts I receive in HTML e-mail messages work.

Your security zone setting is set to the highest security level by default, which disables all active content in HTML messages.

 
 
Applies to:
Outlook 2003