Demo: Breeze through e-mail in Reading Pane

Filmstrip Play Demo Demo button

It's been one of those days. You had a string of meetings, and then, when you finally got back to your office, a long telephone call. Your Inbox is loaded with e-mail messages that have to be dealt with before you can leave for the day.

Check out the new Reading Pane in Microsoft Office Outlook 2003 and see how it can help you handle your messages and get out of the door in time to take your daughter to soccer practice. With the Reading Pane open, the content of each message is visible when you click it. You can open attachments, follow hyperlinks, accept or decline meeting invitations, and vote without ever actually opening a message. And the handy InfoBar keeps you on track by letting you know if and when you already responded to or forwarded the message you're viewing.

 Note   For screen reader text detailing the onscreen actions and a screen reader version of the audio script, click Demo text version.

ShowDemo text version

Screen Action Audio Script

Nancy Davolio's Outlook 2003 Inbox is open, showing a long list of e-mail messages. The pointer selects a couple of messages, and then opens one from Janet Leverling that includes an attachment. The message closes.

On the View menu, the pointer moves to Reading Pane, and then clicks Right. A Reading Pane opens to the right of the Inbox. The content of the selected message from Janet Leverling that includes the attachment is visible in the pane.

Has life gotten so busy lately that you feel like you don't even have time to open your e-mail messages? If so, the Outlook 2003 Reading Pane was designed for you. Remember the Preview Pane found in earlier versions of Outlook? That feature has been redesigned and optimized as the Reading Pane to show more of your message and to make your messages easier to read.
The pointer moves to another message from Andrew Fuller that also includes an attachment called Employee Handbook.doc. That message is visible in the Reading Pane. The pointer double-clicks the attachment. A dialog box opens warning Nancy to open attachments only if they are from trusted sources. Nancy clicks OK, and the Employee Handbook document opens in Microsoft Office Word 2003. For starters, how about immediately opening an attachment without having to open the message? You'll quickly find yourself using this feature without a second thought.
The Word document disappears and Nancy's Inbox with the Reading Pane open reappears. The pointer clicks a message from Michael Suyama that includes a link to a Web site. The message and link are visible in the Reading Pane. The pointer clicks the link in the message and the Web site opens in Microsoft Internet Explorer. Colleague sends you a great new Web site to check out? Now you'll save time by exploring it right from the Reading Pane.
Internet Explorer disappears and Nancy's Inbox with the Reading Pane open reappears. The pointer clicks another message from Janet Leverling about yearly sales and that message is visible in the Reading Pane. A banner called the InfoBar at the top of the message indicates the date and time that Nancy replied to the message. You'll really start to depend on the InfoBar too–the banner near the top of a message. Look to this area to tell you if you've already responded to or forwarded a message.
The pointer clicks a meeting request message from Michael, Nancy's manager, and that message appears in the Reading Pane. The Accept, Tentative, Decline, and Propose New Time buttons are all available at the top of the message in the Reading Pane. The pointer clicks Accept. A dialog box appears asking if you want to send the message now, edit it before sending, or not send a response. The pointer selects the Send the message now option, and then clicks OK. When you see that meeting request from your manager, you don't have to waste time opening the message to respond. Not only can you accept a meeting request, but you can propose another time, or decline, right from the Reading Pane.
The pointer moves to a message from Janet Leverling asking recipients to vote for what they would like for lunch on Friday. The message is visible in the Reading Pane. The pointer clicks the dark orange InfoBar at the top of the message that says Vote by clicking in this InfoBar, and then clicks the Veggie option. A dialog box appears asking if you want to send the message now or edit it before sending. The pointer leaves the Send the message now option selected, and then clicks OK. In the Reading Pane, the InfoBar in the message changes from dark orange to gray. The text in the InfoBar indicates how Nancy responded and the date of her response. Important issue to weigh in on? You can vote from the Reading Pane. You can even view your response in the InfoBar in case you forget what you chose for lunch on Friday!
One by one, the pointer selects messages in the Inbox. It deletes some messages and flags others. Outlook 2003 disappears. The animated text Experience Your Own Great Moments appears. Under it appears the static text For more information followed by a URL: http://www.microsoft.com/office. You knew Outlook was great before, but now with the Reading Pane in Outlook 2003 you've got even more help managing the impressive amount of information you face each day. With the time you save reading messages without opening them, imagine how much other work you'll get done!

Assistance Problems watching the video? Try our troubleshooting tips.

 
 
Applies to:
Outlook 2003