Demo: All you see is all you need in InfoPath

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Wish your forms could react immediately to the data that people enter? Your wish just came true! In Microsoft Office InfoPath™ 2003, conditional formatting will make your forms directly interactive and even easier to use.

Conditional formatting lets you change the appearance of your InfoPath form in response to the data that people enter. People who fill out your forms can find and focus on the information that's most relevant to them.

 Note   For screen reader text detailing the onscreen actions and a screen reader version of the audio script, click Demo text version.

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Screen Action Audio Script
An InfoPath form titled My Meeting Agenda is open in the document window. The pointer scrolls down the form, and then moves to the check box labeled Display Action Items? Wouldn't it be great if your InfoPath form changed in response to what people type or select?
The pointer selects the check boxes labeled Display Action Items? and Display Agenda Items? and Display Objective? to show the hidden form sections under each. The pointer then clears the check boxes, and the sections disappear again in turn. Here, for instance, you can see how the objective, the agenda items, and the action items disappear when each check box is clicked.

The pointer moves to the Tools menu and clicks Design this Form. The form opens in Design mode.

The pointer clicks the Meeting Subject field, moves to the Format menu, and clicks Conditional Formatting.

The Conditional Formatting dialog box opens. In it, the pointer clicks the Add button.

The Conditional Format dialog box opens. In it, the pointer selects the check boxes for Bold, Italic, Underline, and Strikethrough. Sample text changes appearance accordingly.

The pointer moves to the Font color box and opens a grid of colors. It selects red and then moves to the Background color box. It opens a grid of sample colors and selects yellow.

The pointer clicks the Cancel button, and the dialog box disappears. It clicks Cancel again to close the other dialog box.

That's done using conditional formatting. Once you apply it to fields or sections, you can make them change font styles, font colors, or background colors, all in response to the data that people enter.

The pointer moves to the File menu and clicks Close.

A form titled My Medical Form appears.

This is great because one form adapts itself to suit each individual user. Everybody gets what's best for them.
The pointer scrolls through the form, which is long and detailed, with many sections. Consider, for instance, something like a complex medical form, full of unique personal information. Health history, medications, allergies — all really important — and all different for each patient.
The pointer moves to the Allergies section and clicks it to select it. The pointer moves to the Format menu and clicks Conditional Formatting. The Conditional Formatting dialog box appears. In it, the pointer clicks the Add button. Conditional formatting makes a complex form like this one quick and easy to work with.

The Conditional Format dialog box opens. In it, under If this condition is true: the pointer selects Allergies Yes/No, and then selects FALSE as the conditional value.

The pointer moves to the check box labeled Hide this control and selects it.

Unused sections that would take up lots of space can be neatly collapsed out of sight.
The pointer clicks OK to close the dialog box, and clicks OK again to close the other dialog box. It then clicks the Preview Form button. What you see is what you need.
The form appears in Preview mode. The pointer moves to the option buttons under Do you have allergies? and clicks Yes. The Allergies section appears. See how easy that was?
The pointer moves to the Drug field. Text appears in the field saying aspirin. The cursor moves to the next field, and the Drug field background changes color to red. And notice how the information for drug allergy stands out. That's conditional formatting!
Next the animated text Experience Your Own Great Moments appears. Under it appears the static text For more information followed by a URL: http://www.microsoft.com/office. Forms that change themselves to be more useful, features that let you decide how — it's all in a day's work for Office 2003.
 
 
Applies to:
InfoPath 2003