About publishing files and folders

 Important   When you publish the files in your Web site in Microsoft Office FrontPage 2003, be aware that there are two kinds of Web sites: a local Web site and a remote Web site:

  • The local Web site is the source Web site that is open in FrontPage. A local Web site can be stored on either a local hard disk drive or a server.
  • The remote Web site is the destination site to which you are publishing. Similarly, a remote Web site can be stored on either a local hard disk drive (if it is acting as a Web server, as in the case of http://localhost) or a remote Web server.

ShowOverview of publishing a Web site

When you publish a Web site, you move all or a selected group of the files and folders that make up the site from one location to another. In Office FrontPage 2003, you publish your site when you want to make it available for site visitors, when you want to make a backup copy of your site, or when you want to update a published site with new content.

Generally, you create files and folders for your Web site on your computer. When you are ready to let site visitors see your site on the World Wide Web or on your organization's intranet, you publish them to a Web server that is maintained by a server administrator or an Internet service provider (ISP) (ISP: A business that provides access to the Internet for such things as electronic mail, chat rooms, or use of the World Wide Web. Some ISPs are multinational, offering access in many locations, while others are limited to a specific region.). Now site visitors can view your Web pages by using a Web browser.

There may be times when you want to make a copy of your Web site and then save it to a particular location on your hard disk drive or on a network drive. The publishing feature in FrontPage is a convenient way to make a backup copy.

When you update your Web site with new files or folders, FrontPage uses specific terms to distinguish between the source site and the destination site. A local Web site is the source Web site that is open in FrontPage, and a remote Web site is the destination site to which you are publishing.

ShowUsing Remote Web Site view to publish

You can publish in both directions when in Remote Web Site view, where files move easily between local and remote locations. This can be most helpful when you are updating a site you have already published.

Remote Web Site view displays icons, with descriptive text, in both the local and remote Web site panes to indicate the publish status of your files.

You can use Remote Web Site view to publish your files to any location. You can publish your site to an extended Web server (Web server: A computer that hosts Web pages and responds to requests from browsers. Also known as an HTTP server, a Web server stores files whose URLs begin with http://.), to Web servers that support File Transfer Protocol (FTP) (FTP: A communication protocol that makes it possible for a user to transfer files between remote locations on a network. This protocol also allows users to use FTP commands, such as listing files and folders, to work with files on a remote location.) or Web-based Distributed Authoring and Versioning (WebDAV) (WebDAV: An application protocol for publishing and managing files on the World Wide Web. It provides support for storing information about a file, so authors can change a file and its properties without overwriting other changes to that file.), or to a location on your computer.

ShowDeciding where to publish

Before you can publish your files to the destination site, you must set the Remote Web Site Properties to reflect the remote Web site.

ShowPublish files and folders to an extended Web server

In Microsoft FrontPage, an extended Web server is one that is running FrontPage 2000 Server Extensions from Microsoft or later, Microsoft Windows SharePoint Services, or SharePoint Team Services 1.0 from Microsoft.

There are several benefits to publishing to a Web server that is running the FrontPage Server Extensions (FrontPage Server Extensions: A set of programs and scripts that support authoring in FrontPage and extend the functionality of a Web server.) or Windows SharePoint Services. Your Web site will have enhanced functionality when it is published, allowing you to use form handlers (form handler: A program on a server that is executed when a site visitor submits a form. A form in FrontPage is associated with a form handler.) and hit counters (Hit Counter component: A component in FrontPage that keeps track of the number of visitors to a World Wide Web site.). FrontPage will also maintain your files and hyperlinks (hyperlink: Colored and underlined text or a graphic that you click to go to a file, a location in a file, a Web page on the World Wide Web, or a Web page on an intranet. Hyperlinks can also go to newsgroups and to Gopher, Telnet, and FTP sites.) each time you publish the Web site.

 Important   When you are publishing or synchronizing between Web sites based on SharePoint Services, certain elements, including list data, schemas, and Web Parts, will not be transferred.

ShowPublish files and folders to a server that supports WebDAV or FTP

You can publish files and folders in your Web site to servers that support Web-based Distributed Authoring and Versioning (WebDAV) (WebDAV: An application protocol for publishing and managing files on the World Wide Web. It provides support for storing information about a file, so authors can change a file and its properties without overwriting other changes to that file.) or File Transfer Protocol (FTP) (FTP: A communication protocol that makes it possible for a user to transfer files between remote locations on a network. This protocol also allows users to use FTP commands, such as listing files and folders, to work with files on a remote location.). Multiple users can use Microsoft FrontPage and Macromedia Dreamweaver to edit the same site over FTP. It's important to note that in most cases the source control functionality in FrontPage is turned off by default. When you turn source control on, do not regard it as a secure file-locking mechanism.

FrontPage also supports passive FTP. Passive FTP allows you to publish files and folders from the local Web site to the remote Web site by using a different port (port: One of the network input/output channels of a computer running TCP/IP. On the World Wide Web, it usually refers to the port number a server is running on. One computer can have many Web servers running on it, but only one server can run on a port.) each time.

When you use Remote Web Site view to publish your files or folders to a server that supports FTP or WebDAV, you must know the server name as well as your user name and password. If you are unsure about your user name, password, or server location, contact your Internet service provider (ISP: A business that provides access to the Internet for such things as electronic mail, chat rooms, or use of the World Wide Web. Some ISPs are multinational, offering access in many locations, while others are limited to a specific region.) (ISP) or Web site administrator.

ShowPublish files and folders to a local hard disk drive or server

You can publish the files and folders in your Web site to a folder on your local file system or to a UNC (universal naming convention (UNC): A naming convention for files that provides a machine-independent means of locating the file. Rather than specifying a drive letter and path, a UNC name uses the syntax \\server\share\path\filename.) path. For example, you can make a backup copy of your entire Web site by publishing it to a new disk-based location, such as C:\Backup.

Publishing files and folders rather than just copying them ensures that they will maintain their structure and that the Microsoft FrontPage components (component: A built-in FrontPage object that is evaluated and executed when an author saves the page or, in some cases, when a site visitor goes to the page. Most components generate HTML. Components include search forms, and Save Results form handlers.) on your Web pages will work.

ShowChoosing the files to publish

By default, all files are marked for publishing. By using Remote Web Site view in Microsoft FrontPage, you can choose which files will be published and which will be held back. There are some files that you should not republish. For example, if your Web site has a guest book, republishing the guest book file will cause it to be replaced by a blank file. Other examples include pages with a hit counter (Hit Counter component: A component in FrontPage that keeps track of the number of visitors to a World Wide Web site.) or discussion Web sites.

ShowSynchronizing files between sites

In collaborative work environments, multiple authors may update both the local and remote Web sites. Microsoft FrontPage will compare the files in the local Web site to the published files in the remote Web site.

The following scenarios are examples of situations in which local and remote versions of files require that you synchronize them:

  • You publish to a staging server to test the files before making them visible to the public.
  • You change a file directly on the remote site, leaving the local version of that file out of date.
  • Two people, one working on a local version of the Web site and one working directly on the remote Web site, update their respective versions of the same file.
  • Two people, working with copies of the same Web site on their own computers, make changes to the same sets of files, and both want to publish to the remote site.

If FrontPage detects a newer version of a file on your local Web site, it will begin a synchronization to update both the local and remote Web sites unless you specify otherwise. You can also choose to publish from the remote Web site to your local Web site.

Security  When you synchronize files using the Remote Web Site view, files on the remote site will be downloaded to the local site. If malicious files were placed on the remote site, the local site may be at risk. Be sure that only trusted users have access to the remote site before you attempt to synchronize files.

ShowManaging the files on the Web server

If your Internet service provider (ISP: A business that provides access to the Internet for such things as electronic mail, chat rooms, or use of the World Wide Web. Some ISPs are multinational, offering access in many locations, while others are limited to a specific region.) (ISP) or system administrator has given you a size limit on the Web server (Web server: A computer that hosts Web pages and responds to requests from browsers. Also known as an HTTP server, a Web server stores files whose URLs begin with http://.), file management is a necessity. Periodically deleting unused or old files can keep the size of your Web site down.

Because Microsoft FrontPage automatically synchronizes the files on your local hard disk drive, you must first delete or move the files or folders on your local Web site. After you publish your Web site, FrontPage will prompt you about deleting the same files on the Web server.

If your Web server uses the FrontPage Server Extensions (FrontPage Server Extensions: A set of programs and scripts that support authoring in FrontPage and extend the functionality of a Web server.) from Microsoft or Microsoft Windows SharePoint Services, FrontPage can also match other actions on the Web server — such as moving or renaming files — the next time you publish your Web site. FrontPage will update your link bars (link bar: A collection of graphic or text buttons representing hyperlinks to pages both within your Web site and to external sites.), shared borders (shared borders: Page regions reserved for content that you want to appear consistently on all your Web pages. Shared borders usually contain link bars, which contain hyperlinks to the other pages and locations.), and hyperlinks (hyperlink: Colored and underlined text or a graphic that you click to go to a file, a location in a file, a Web page on the World Wide Web, or a Web page on an intranet. Hyperlinks can also go to newsgroups and to Gopher, Telnet, and FTP sites.) on the Web server to match the actions you performed on the local Web site.

 Notes 

  • On the View menu, if the Remote Web Site view option is unavailable (appears dimmed), verify that you have named and saved your Web page or site.
  • Before you can publish or synchronize your Web files, you must set up a remote Web server type and remote Web site location in the Remote Web Site Properties dialog box.
 
 
Applies to:
FrontPage 2003