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Get to know Excel 2010: Create formulas

Test yourself

Complete the following test so you can be sure you understand the material. Your answers are private, and test results are not scored.


Every formula in Excel starts with an equal sign.

True.

False.

What is the first rule of math operator precedence?

Take care of exponents (roots and powers) first.

Divide before you add.

Take care of anything in parentheses or brackets first.

Which part of this math problem will Excel calculate first: =30/5*3?

Divide 30/5.

Multiply 5*3.

If you want to add the values that are in cells C1 and C2 (93 and 14), why would you use cell references in the formula (=C1+C2) instead of just writing the formula like this: =93+14?

The formula is more professional looking.

The formula will be more accurate.

The formula result will automatically update when cell values change.

When you use a function in a formula, you always let Excel create the formula for you.

True.

False.

You’ve used the SUM function to add the numbers in column C. You want to copy the formula from column C to add the numbers in column D. What kind of cell reference will be in the new formula in column D?

Absolute.

Mixed.

Relative.

You can enter formulas at the bottom of columns and at the end of rows.

True.

False.

What type of cell reference is this: A$1.

Relative.

Mixed.

Absolute.

You’re using the PMT function to figure out the monthly payment on a loan. When you enter the Rate argument (interest rate), you write it like this: 3.5%.

True.

False.

You have a list of badly capitalized names. You can tidy up the names by using what function?

UPPER.

TRIM.

PROPER.

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