Demo: Excel lists make your data dance

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If you're familiar with Microsoft Excel, you're used to sorting data, filtering data, and performing quick calculations. Now Microsoft Office Excel 2003 wraps all those useful features into one convenient package. Meet the List command.

The List command puts everything you use everyday right at your fingertips. No more going to separate menus and various buttons. And lists will help you find answers quickly in large or complex worksheets. Create a list for part of the worksheet, and you can sort that data separately, without affecting the rest of the worksheet. The values couldn't be clearer.

 Note   For screen reader text detailing the onscreen actions and a screen reader version of the audio script, click Demo text version.

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Screen Action Audio Script
Excel 2003 is open showing a worksheet of sales figures for the years 2006 and 2007. The pointer goes to the Data menu, points to Filter, and then clicks AutoFilter. The AutoFilter buttons appear at the top of worksheet Columns A through F. If you're familiar with Excel, you know that you can sort or filter your data…
The pointer highlights Column F, and then clicks the AutoSum button on the toolbar. A total appears at the bottom of the column. …and you can add calculations, such as totals, to your worksheets with just a few clicks.
The worksheet returns to its appearance at the beginning. The pointer selects the 2006 data. It then goes to the Data menu, points to List, and clicks Create List. The Create List dialog box appears, and the pointer clicks OK. The dialog box closes, and the List toolbar appears. So, let's go back, and I'll show you something new in Excel 2003. This is the List command. It's easy to use...
The pointer clicks the AutoFilter button in Column C to show options for sorting and filtering data in the column, then closes that menu of options. …and it wraps those familiar tools into one convenient package. You can see that the AutoFilter buttons work just like they always have, only now you can do a lot more.
The pointer then moves to the List toolbar and clicks the Toggle Total Row button. A total value appears at the bottom of Column F. For instance, you can total your data without running the AutoSum command. It's one click now.
The pointer selects the 2007 data. It then goes to the Data menu, points to List, and clicks Create List. The Create List dialog box appears, and the pointer clicks OK. The dialog box closes. The new list is smaller than the first and located to the right. The pointer clicks the Toggle Total Row button, and a total value appears at the bottom of column J. The pointer goes to the bottom of Column I, where it opens a menu of calculation options. The pointer highlights the options and then clicks Sum. A total value appears at the bottom of Column I. Other types of calculations are also at your fingertips. I'll run the List command again and add the total row to show you what I mean. Do you want an average? An item count? A sum? Just select from the menu.
The pointer selects cell H11 in the second list. From there, it goes to the List toolbar and clicks the List button to open a menu. The pointer points to Insert and clicks Row. After a new row appears in the second list, the pointer inserts another row in the second list. Data appears to fill the two new rows. What's more, you can add new rows to any list without disturbing the data next to it. You don't have to cut, paste, or move anything. Notice how I've added two rows without affecting the 2006 data. That's another big time saver.
The pointer goes to Column D and clicks the AutoFilter button to show a menu of options. It clicks Sort Descending. The data in Column D is sorted without affecting the surrounding data. The pointer opens the menu of options again and clicks Sort Ascending to restore the data to its previous order. You can also sort the data in a list without affecting the rest of the worksheet, making it much easier to find answers in large or complex files.
The animated text Experience Your Own Great Moments appears. Under it appears the static text For more information followed by a URL: http://www.microsoft.com/office. The List command helps you get more value in less time from your data. You can work faster, and you can work smarter, with Excel 2003 and Office 2003.

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Applies to:
Excel 2003