Correct a #N/A error

Try Office 2010 In Excel 2010, you can use the IFERROR function to correct #N/A errors in your worksheet.
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A #N/A error occurs when a value is not available to a function or formula.

  1. Click the cell that displays the error, click the button that appears Button image, and then click Trace Error if it appears.
  2. Review the possible causes and solutions.

Possible causes and solutions

Missing data, and #N/A or NA() has been entered in its place

Replace #N/A with new data.

 Note   You can enter #N/A in those cells where data is not yet available. Formulas that refer to those cells will then return #N/A instead of attempting to calculate a value.

Giving an inappropriate value for the lookup_value argument in the HLOOKUP, LOOKUP, MATCH, or VLOOKUP worksheet function

Make sure the lookup_value argument (argument: The values that a function uses to perform operations or calculations. The type of argument a function uses is specific to the function. Common arguments that are used within functions include numbers, text, cell references, and names.) is the correct type of value — for example, a value or a cell reference, but not a range reference.

Using the VLOOKUP, HLOOKUP, or MATCH worksheet function to locate a value in an unsorted table

By default, functions that look up information in tables must be sorted in ascending order. However, the VLOOKUP and HLOOKUP worksheet functions contain a range_lookup argument (argument: The values that a function uses to perform operations or calculations. The type of argument a function uses is specific to the function. Common arguments that are used within functions include numbers, text, cell references, and names.) that instructs the function to find an exact match even if the table is not sorted. To find an exact match, set the range_lookup argument to FALSE.

The MATCH worksheet function contains a match_type argument that specifies the order the list must be sorted in to find a match. If the function cannot find a match, try changing the match_type argument. To find an exact match, set the match_type argument to 0.

Using an argument in an array formula that is not the same number of rows or columns as the range that contains the array formula

If the array formula (array formula: A formula that performs multiple calculations on one or more sets of values, and then returns either a single result or multiple results. Array formulas are enclosed between braces { } and are entered by pressing CTRL+SHIFT+ENTER.) has been entered into multiple cells, make sure the ranges referenced by the formula have the same number of rows and columns, or enter the array formula into fewer cells. For example, if the array formula has been entered into a range 15 rows high (C1:C15) and the formula refers to a range 10 rows high (A1:A10), the range C11:C15 will display #N/A. To correct this error, enter the formula into a smaller range (for example, C1:C10), or change the range to which the formula refers to the same number of rows (for example, A1:A15).

Omitting one or more required arguments from a built-in or custom worksheet function

Enter all arguments in the function.

Using a custom worksheet function that is not available

Make sure the workbook that contains the worksheet function is open and the function is working properly.

Running a macro that enters a function that returns #N/A

Make sure the arguments (argument: The values that a function uses to perform operations or calculations. The type of argument a function uses is specific to the function. Common arguments that are used within functions include numbers, text, cell references, and names.) in the function are correct and in the correct position.

 
 
Applies to:
Excel 2003