About Excel templates

To create new workbooks that already have your preferred formatting, you can base the new workbooks on a template (template: A workbook that you create and use as the basis for other similar workbooks. You can create templates for workbooks and worksheets. The default template for workbooks is called Book.xlt. The default template for worksheets is called Sheet.xlt.). A template can include formatting, styles (style: A combination of formatting characteristics, such as font, font size, and indentation, that you name and store as a set. When you apply a style, all of the formatting instructions in that style are applied at one time.), standardized text such as page headers and row and column labels, formulas, Visual Basic for Applications macros (macro: An action or a set of actions that you can use to automate tasks. Macros are recorded in the Visual Basic for Applications programming language.), and custom toolbars.

ShowUsing pre-defined templates

Downloading templates

Numerous templates have been created for use in Excel. You can download these templates from Templates on Office Online.

Accessing templates

When you open a new file, you'll have easy access to templates that are on Office Online, on your computer, or on your own Web sites. You can simply select any of these options in the Getting Started task pane.

ShowCreating workbook or worksheet templates

Creating a default workbook template

You can create a default workbook template (default workbook template: The Book.xlt template that you create to change the default format of new workbooks. Excel uses the template to create a blank workbook when you start Excel or create a new workbook without specifying a template.). This template defines the formatting or content of the new workbooks that open when you start Microsoft Excel. Workbooks you create by clicking New Button image are based on the default workbook template. The default template for workbooks is called Book.xlt.

You can create additional custom workbook templates designed for specific tasks and projects.

Creating a default worksheet template

You can create a default sheet template (default worksheet template: The Sheet.xlt template that you create to change the default format of new worksheets. Excel uses the template to create a blank worksheet when you add a new worksheet to a workbook.).

This template defines the formatting and content of the default worksheets you insert with the Worksheet command (Insert menu). The default template for worksheets is called Sheet.xlt.

If you use a variety of worksheets in your workbooks, you can create additional custom sheet templates.

ShowStoring templates

Storing default workbook and worksheet templates

If you've created a template named Book.xlt or Sheet.xlt and saved it in the XLStart folder, Microsoft Excel uses the template to create new default workbooks (default startup workbook: The new, unsaved workbook that's displayed when you start Excel. The default startup workbook is displayed only if you haven't included other workbooks in the XLStart folder.) or to insert new worksheets. The XLStart folder is usually located at:

C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office\Office11\XLStart

To use template (.xlt) files stored on a network file location, you can specify that location as the alternate startup folder (alternate startup folder: A folder in addition to the XLStart folder that contains workbooks or other files that you want to be opened automatically when you start Excel and templates that you want to be available when you create new workbooks.).

ShowSharing templates

You can make a custom template available to others by storing the template on a network location. For example, you might want all users in your workgroup to use a custom template for a special project. Place the template in a folder in a network location that is accessible to all users in your group.

ShowSettings that are saved with a template

Formatting

Text, data, graphics, and formulas

  • Text you want to repeat, such as page headers and row and column labels
  • Data, graphics, formulas, charts, and other information
  • Data validation settings

Toolbars, automation, and Option settings

 
 
Applies to:
Excel 2003