Undo or redo data entry or design changes

If you complete several typing actions in Microsoft Office Access and then decide that you do not want to keep those changes, you can undo the changes. If, after you undo a typing action, you decide that you wanted to restore the text, you can use the Redo typing option. You can undo and redo up to 20 of your last typing actions. The Undo and Redo features let you remove or repeat single or multiple typing actions.

Similarly, you can undo most design changes that you make to database objects, such as adding a control to a report or adding a sort order to a query field.

What do you want to do?


Undo data entry

  • To undo the most recent data entry, press CTRL+Z.
  • To undo several actions, do one of the following:
    • On the Quick Access Toolbar, click the arrow next to Undo Typing Button image, and then select the actions that you want to undo.

Selecting undo actions from list

All of the selected typing actions are reversed. However, the actions that you can undo will begin with the most recent action and you may only undo the actions in the order in which they occurred. For example, you cannot undo just the second typing changes that you made. To undo the second typing change, you must also undo the action that preceded it.

  • If you can’t reach the Quick Access Toolbar (for example, because you are using a modal form), press CTRL+Z repeatedly until the action that you want to undo is undone.

 Important   Some actions can't be undone, such as clicking any Microsoft Office Button Button image command or saving a file. When an action cannot be undone, the Undo Typing command changes to Can't Undo.

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Undo design changes

You can undo design changes to database objects in the same way that you undo data entry.

  • To undo the most recent design change, press CTRL+Z
  • To undo several actions, do one of the following:
  • Press CTRL+Z repeatedly until the action that you want to undo is undone.
  • On the Quick Access Toolbar, click the arrow next to Undo Button image, and then select the actions that you want to undo.

Selecting undo actions from list

All of the selected typing actions are reversed. However, the actions that you can undo will begin with the most recent action and you may only undo the actions in the order in which they occurred. For example, you cannot undo just the second typing changes that you made. To undo the second typing change, you must also undo the action that preceded it.

 Important   Some actions can't be undone, such as clicking any Microsoft Office Button Button image command or saving a file. When an action cannot be undone, the Undo Typing command changes to Can't Undo.

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Redo actions that you undid

  • To redo the most recent action that you undid, press CTRL+Y.
  • To redo several actions, do one of the following:
    • Press CTRL+Y repeatedly until the actions are redone.
    • On the Quick Access Toolbar, click the arrow next to Redo Button image, and then click the actions that you want to redo.

Selecting actions to redo from list

The actions are redone in the order in which they are listed. You can only redo the actions in the order in which they occurred. For example, you cannot redo only the second action that you undid. To redo the second action, you must also redo the action that preceded it.

 Important   When the Undo and Redo commands are not available, the previous actions cannot be repeated.

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Other Options

Besides undo, you can help prevent the loss of work due to errors by using Backup and Restore, and by using Application Parts (a kind of template).

Backup and Restore

Before you start work on a major design revision, make a backup of the database. Then, if you make a series of design changes and can’t undo them all, you can restore as much from the backup as you need. For more information, see the article Protect your data with backup and restore processes.

Application Parts

If there are standard components that you use in most of or all your databases, consider creating an application part. An application part is a kind of template that you can add to an existing database, and can consist of one or more database objects, with or without data.

After you add an application part, you can modify it as needed. If you make design mistakes, or simply decide you don’t like the changes you’ve made, you can delete the revised objects, and add the application part again. For more information, see the article Save and reuse database design elements.

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Applies to:
Access 2010