Manage user and group accounts (MDB)

 Note   The information in this topic applies only to a Microsoft Access database (.mdb).

Database user accounts (user account: An account identified by a user name and personal ID (PID) that is created to manage the user's permissions to access database objects in an Access workgroup.) provide specific privileges to individuals to access information and resources in the database. A group account (group account: A collection of user accounts in a workgroup, identified by group name and personal ID (PID). Permissions assigned to a group apply to all users in the group.) contains a number of user accounts and provides a means of controlling and managing the permissions (permissions: A set of attributes that specifies what kind of access a user has to data or objects in a database.) and access of this group to the objects in the database.

Create accounts, add users, and print information

ShowCreate a security administrator account

To complete this procedure, you must be logged on as a member of the Admins group (Admins group: The system administrator's group account, which retains full permissions on all databases used by a workgroup. The Setup program automatically adds the default Admin user account to the Admins group.).

  1. Start Microsoft Access by using a security-enabled workgroup (security-enabled workgroup: An Access workgroup in which users log on with a user name and password and in which access to database objects is restricted according to permissions granted to specific user accounts and groups.).

ShowHow?

A Microsoft Access workgroup information file (workgroup information file: A file that Access reads at startup that contains information about the users in a workgroup. This information includes users' account names, their passwords, and the groups of which they are members.) contains a list of users who share data, also know as a workgroup (workgroup: A group of users in a multiuser environment who share data and the same workgroup information file.). Users' passwords are also stored in the workgroup information file. To control who has access to your database, you must create a new workgroup information file.

  1. Start Microsoft Access.
  2. On the Tools menu, point to Security, and then click Workgroup Administrator.
  3. In the Workgroup Administrator dialog box, click Create.
  4. In the Workgroup Owner Information dialog box, type your name and organization, and then type any combination of up to 20 numbers and letters for the workgroup ID (WID) (workgroup ID: A case-sensitive alphanumeric string that is 4 to 20 characters long and that you enter when creating a new workgroup information file by using the Workgroup Administrator. This uniquely identifies the Admin group for this workgroup file.).

Be sure to write down your exact name, organization, and workgroup ID — including whether letters are uppercase or lowercase (for all three entries) — and keep them in a secure place. If you have to re-create the workgroup information file, you must supply exactly the same name, organization, and workgroup ID. If you forget or lose these entries, you can't recover them and might lose access to your databases.

  1. Type a new name for the new workgroup information file. To save in a different location, type a new path or click Browse to specify the new path.
  2. Click OK.

The new workgroup information file is used the next time you start Microsoft Access. Any user (user account: An account identified by a user name and personal ID (PID) that is created to manage the user's permissions to access database objects in an Access workgroup.) and group accounts (group account: A collection of user accounts in a workgroup, identified by group name and personal ID (PID). Permissions assigned to a group apply to all users in the group.) or passwords that you create are saved in the new workgroup information file. To have others join the workgroup defined by your new workgroup information file, copy the file to a shared folder (if you didn't already save it in a shared folder in step 5), and then have each user run the Workgroup Administrator to join the new workgroup information file.

 Important   To help protect your database, don't use the default workgroup (workgroup: A group of users in a multiuser environment who share data and the same workgroup information file.) defined by the workgroup information file (workgroup information file: A file that Access reads at startup that contains information about the users in a workgroup. This information includes users' account names, their passwords, and the groups of which they are members.) that was created when you installed Microsoft Access. You should make sure the workgroup information file that defines the workgroup you are using has been created with a unique workgroup ID (WID) (workgroup ID: A case-sensitive alphanumeric string that is 4 to 20 characters long and that you enter when creating a new workgroup information file by using the Workgroup Administrator. This uniquely identifies the Admin group for this workgroup file.), and, if not, you should create a new file.

  1. Open a database.
  2. On the Tools menu, point to Security, and then click User And Group Accounts.
  3. On the Users tab, click New.
  4. In the New User/Group dialog box, type the name of the administrator account and a personal ID (PID (personal ID: A case-sensitive alphanumeric string that is 4 to 20 characters long and that Access uses in combination with the account name to identify a user or group in an Access workgroup.)), and then click OK to create the new account.

ShowGuidelines for passwords

Use strong passwords that combine uppercase and lowercase letters, numbers, and symbols. Weak passwords don't mix these elements. Strong password: Y6dh!et5. Weak password: House27. Passwords should be 8 or more characters in length. A pass phrase that uses 14 or more characters is better. For more information, see Help protect your personal information with strong passwords.

It is critical that you remember your password. If you forget your password, Microsoft cannot retrieve it. Store the passwords that you write down in a secure place away from the information that they help protect.

User names can range from 1 to 20 characters, and can include alphabetic characters, accented characters, numbers, spaces, and symbols, with the following exceptions:

  • The characters " \ [ ] : | < > + = ; , . ? *
  • Leading spaces
  • Control characters (ASCII 10 through ASCII 31)

 Note   Passwords are case-sensitive (case-sensitive: Capable of distinguishing between uppercase and lowercase letters. A case-sensitive search finds only text that is an exact match of uppercase and lowercase letters.).

Be sure to write down the exact account name and PID entries, including whether letters are uppercase or lowercase, and keep them in a secure place. If you ever have to re-create the account, you must supply the same name and PID entries. If you forget or lose these entries, you can't recover them.

 Notes 

  1. In the Available Groups box, click Admins, and then click Add.

Microsoft Access adds the new administrator account to the Admins group and displays Admins in the Member Of box.

ShowCreate a security user account

To complete this procedure, you must be logged on as a member of the Admins group (Admins group: The system administrator's group account, which retains full permissions on all databases used by a workgroup. The Setup program automatically adds the default Admin user account to the Admins group.).

 Note   It is usually easier to manage security if you organize users into groups, and then assign permissions (permissions: A set of attributes that specifies what kind of access a user has to data or objects in a database.) to groups rather than to individual users.

  1. Start Microsoft Access by using the workgroup (workgroup: A group of users in a multiuser environment who share data and the same workgroup information file.) in which you want to use the account.

 Important   The accounts you create for users must be stored in the workgroup information file (workgroup information file: A file that Access reads at startup that contains information about the users in a workgroup. This information includes users' account names, their passwords, and the groups of which they are members.) that those users will use. If you're using a different workgroup to create the database, change your workgroup before creating the accounts. You can use the Workgroup Administrator (point to Security on the Tools menu) to find out which workgroup information file is currently in use.

  1. Open a database.
  2. On the Tools menu, point to Security, and then click User And Group Accounts.
  3. On the Users tab, click New.
  4. In the New User/Group dialog box, type the name of the new account and a personal ID (PID) (personal ID: A case-sensitive alphanumeric string that is 4 to 20 characters long and that Access uses in combination with the account name to identify a user or group in an Access workgroup.), and then click OK to create the new account, which is automatically added to the Users group (Users group: The group account that contains all user accounts. Access automatically adds user accounts to the Users group when you create them.).

Be sure to write down the exact account name and PID, including whether letters are uppercase or lowercase, and keep them in a secure place. If you ever have to re-create an account that has been deleted or created in a different workgroup, you must supply the same name and PID entries. If you forget or lose these entries, you can't recover them.

 Notes 

ShowCreate a security group account

As part of securing a database, you can create group accounts (group account: A collection of user accounts in a workgroup, identified by group name and personal ID (PID). Permissions assigned to a group apply to all users in the group.) in your Microsoft Access workgroup (workgroup: A group of users in a multiuser environment who share data and the same workgroup information file.) that you use to assign a common set of permissions (permissions: A set of attributes that specifies what kind of access a user has to data or objects in a database.) to multiple users.

To complete this procedure, you must be logged on as a member of the Admins group (Admins group: The system administrator's group account, which retains full permissions on all databases used by a workgroup. The Setup program automatically adds the default Admin user account to the Admins group.).

  1. Start Microsoft Access by using the workgroup in which you want to use the account.

 Important   The accounts you create for users must be stored in the workgroup information file (workgroup information file: A file that Access reads at startup that contains information about the users in a workgroup. This information includes users' account names, their passwords, and the groups of which they are members.) that those users will use. If you're using a different workgroup to create the database, change your workgroup before creating the accounts. You can use the Workgroup Administrator (point to Security on the Tools menu) to change workgroups and to find out which workgroup information file is currently in use.

  1. Open a database.
  2. On the Tools menu, point to Security, and then click User And Group Accounts.
  3. On the Groups tab, click New.
  4. In the New User/Group dialog box, type the name of the new account and a personal ID (PID) (personal ID: A case-sensitive alphanumeric string that is 4 to 20 characters long and that Access uses in combination with the account name to identify a user or group in an Access workgroup.).

Be sure to write down the exact account name and PID, including whether letters are uppercase or lowercase, and keep them in a secure place. If you have to re-create an account that has been deleted or created in a different workgroup, you must supply the same name and PID entries. If you forget or lose these entries, you can't recover them.

 Note   A user account name cannot be same as an existing group account name, and visa versa.

  1. Click OK to create the new group account.

 Note   The PID entered in step 5 is not a password. Microsoft Access uses the PID and the user name as seeds for an encryption algorithm to generate an encrypted identifier for the user account (user account: An account identified by a user name and personal ID (PID) that is created to manage the user's permissions to access database objects in an Access workgroup.).

ShowAdd users to security groups

To complete this procedure, you must be logged on as a member of the Admins group (Admins group: The system administrator's group account, which retains full permissions on all databases used by a workgroup. The Setup program automatically adds the default Admin user account to the Admins group.).

  1. Start Microsoft Access by using the workgroup (workgroup: A group of users in a multiuser environment who share data and the same workgroup information file.) that contains the user (user account: An account identified by a user name and personal ID (PID) that is created to manage the user's permissions to access database objects in an Access workgroup.) and group accounts (group account: A collection of user accounts in a workgroup, identified by group name and personal ID (PID). Permissions assigned to a group apply to all users in the group.).

You can find out which workgroup is current or change workgroups by using the Workgroup Administrator.

  1. Open the database.
  2. On the Tools menu, point to Security, and then click User And Group Accounts.
  3. On the Users tab, enter in the Name box the user you want to add to a group.
  4. In the Available Groups box, click the group you want to add the user to, and then click Add.

The selected group is displayed in the Member Of list.

  1. Repeat step 5 if you want to add this user to any other groups. Repeat steps 4 and 5 to add other users to groups.

ShowPrint information about security users and groups

 Note   If the workgroup information file (workgroup information file: A file that Access reads at startup that contains information about the users in a workgroup. This information includes users' account names, their passwords, and the groups of which they are members.) was created with Microsoft Access 95 or later, all users in the workgroup (workgroup: A group of users in a multiuser environment who share data and the same workgroup information file.) can print user and group information. If you are using a workgroup information file created with Microsoft Access version 2.0, you must be logged on as a member of the Admins group (Admins group: The system administrator's group account, which retains full permissions on all databases used by a workgroup. The Setup program automatically adds the default Admin user account to the Admins group.) to print user and group information.

  1. Start Microsoft Access by using the workgroup information file whose security information you want to print.

You can find out which workgroup information file is current or change workgroups by using the Workgroup Administrator.

  1. Open a database.
  2. On the Tools menu, point to Security, and then click User And Group Accounts.
  3. On the Users tab, click Print Users And Groups.
  4. In the Print Security dialog box, do one of the following:

Click Only Users to print a report showing all users defined for the current workgroup.

Click Only Groups to print a report showing all groups defined for the current workgroup.

Click Both Users And Groups to print both user and group account information.

Delete accounts and remove users

ShowRemove users from security groups

To complete this procedure, you must be logged on as a member of the Admins group (Admins group: The system administrator's group account, which retains full permissions on all databases used by a workgroup. The Setup program automatically adds the default Admin user account to the Admins group.).

Notes

  1. Start Microsoft Access by using the workgroup (workgroup: A group of users in a multiuser environment who share data and the same workgroup information file.) containing the user and group accounts.

You can find out which workgroup is current or change workgroups by using the Workgroup Administrator.

  1. Open a database.
  2. On the Tools menu, point to Security, and then click User And Group Accounts.
  3. On the Users tab, enter the user you want to remove in the Name box.
  4. In the Member Of box, click the group you want to remove the user from, and then click Remove.
  5. Repeat step 5 to remove this user from any other groups. Repeat steps 4 and 5 to remove other users from groups.

ShowDelete a security user account

To complete this procedure, you must be logged on as a member of the Admins group (Admins group: The system administrator's group account, which retains full permissions on all databases used by a workgroup. The Setup program automatically adds the default Admin user account to the Admins group.).

 Note   The Admin user account (Admin account: The default user account. When you install Access, the Setup program automatically includes the Admin user account in the workgroup information file that it creates.) can't be deleted.

  1. Open a database.
  2. On the Tools menu, point to Security, and then click User And Group Accounts.
  3. On the Users tab, enter a user in the Name box, and then click Delete.
  4. Click Yes to delete the user account.
  5. Repeat steps 3 and 4 if you want to delete additional user accounts, and then click OK when you have finished.

ShowDelete a security group account

To complete this procedure, you must be logged on as a member of the Admins group (Admins group: The system administrator's group account, which retains full permissions on all databases used by a workgroup. The Setup program automatically adds the default Admin user account to the Admins group.).

 Note   The Admins and Users group (Users group: The group account that contains all user accounts. Access automatically adds user accounts to the Users group when you create them.) accounts can't be deleted.

  1. Start Microsoft Access by using the workgroup (workgroup: A group of users in a multiuser environment who share data and the same workgroup information file.) that contains the account you want to delete.

You can find out which workgroup is current or change workgroups by using the Workgroup Administrator.

  1. Open a database.
  2. On the Tools menu, point to Security, and then click User And Group Accounts.
  3. On the Groups tab, enter the group you want to delete in the Name box, and then click Delete.
  4. Click Yes to delete the group account.
  5. Repeat steps 4 and 5 if you want to delete additional group accounts.

View or transfer ownership

ShowView or transfer ownership of individual objects in a security-enabled database

If you have Administer permission for a table, query, form, report, or macro, you can view the owner (owner: When security is being used, the user account that has control over a database or database object. By default, the user account that created a database or database object is the owner.) of the object or transfer its ownership to another user or group.

 Note   If you change ownership of a table, query, form, report, or macro to a group account, all users who belong to the group automatically receive the permissions associated with ownership of the object.

  1. Open the database.
  2. On the Tools menu, point to Security, and then click User And Group Permissions.

On the Change Owner tab, Microsoft Access displays a list of the tables, queries, forms, reports, and macros that are currently displayed in the Database window (Database window: In Access 2003 and earlier, the window that appears when a database or project is opened. It displays shortcuts for creating new database objects and opening existing objects. In later versions, it is replaced by the Navigation Pane.), and the current owner of those objects.

  1. Click an object type in the Object Type box, or use the existing object type.
  2. From the Object list, click one or more objects whose ownership that you want to change. To select more than one object, either hold down CTRL and click the objects, or drag through the ones you want to select.
  3. In the New Owner box, click the user or group account that you want to be the new owner of the object or objects.
  4. Click the Change Owner button.

ShowTransfer ownership of an entire database to another administrator

 Note   To import a database, you must have Open/Run permission for the database, and Read Design permission for its objects. To import tables, you must also have Read Data permission. If you have permissions for some tables, queries, forms, reports, and macros but not others, Microsoft Access imports only those objects for which you have permissions.

  1. Start Microsoft Access by using a security-enabled workgroup (security-enabled workgroup: An Access workgroup in which users log on with a user name and password and in which access to database objects is restricted according to permissions granted to specific user accounts and groups.) that contains the user account that you want to own the database and its objects.

ShowHow?

A Microsoft Access workgroup information file (workgroup information file: A file that Access reads at startup that contains information about the users in a workgroup. This information includes users' account names, their passwords, and the groups of which they are members.) contains a list of users who share data, also know as a workgroup (workgroup: A group of users in a multiuser environment who share data and the same workgroup information file.). Users' passwords are also stored in the workgroup information file. To control who has access to your database, you must create a new workgroup information file.

  1. Start Microsoft Access.
  2. On the Tools menu, point to Security, and then click Workgroup Administrator.
  3. In the Workgroup Administrator dialog box, click Create.
  4. In the Workgroup Owner Information dialog box, type your name and organization, and then type any combination of up to 20 numbers and letters for the workgroup ID (WID) (workgroup ID: A case-sensitive alphanumeric string that is 4 to 20 characters long and that you enter when creating a new workgroup information file by using the Workgroup Administrator. This uniquely identifies the Admin group for this workgroup file.).

Be sure to write down your exact name, organization, and workgroup ID — including whether letters are uppercase or lowercase (for all three entries) — and keep them in a secure place. If you have to re-create the workgroup information file, you must supply exactly the same name, organization, and workgroup ID. If you forget or lose these entries, you can't recover them and might lose access to your databases.

  1. Type a new name for the new workgroup information file. By default, the workgroup information file is saved in the language folder. To save in a different location, type a new path or click Browse to specify the new path.

The new workgroup information file is used the next time you start Microsoft Access. Any user (user account: An account identified by a user name and personal ID (PID) that is created to manage the user's permissions to access database objects in an Access workgroup.) and group accounts (group account: A collection of user accounts in a workgroup, identified by group name and personal ID (PID). Permissions assigned to a group apply to all users in the group.) or passwords that you create are saved in the new workgroup information file. To have others join the workgroup defined by your new workgroup information file, copy the file to a shared folder (if you didn't already save it in a shared folder in step 5), and then have each user run the Workgroup Administrator to join the new workgroup information file.

You can find out which workgroup is current or change workgroups by using the Workgroup Administrator.

  1. Log on by using that account.
  2. Create a new blank database.
  3. Import all of the objects into the new database from the database that has the ownership you want to change.

ShowHow?

  1. Open the database or switch to the Database window (Database window: In Access 2003 and earlier, the window that appears when a database or project is opened. It displays shortcuts for creating new database objects and opening existing objects. In later versions, it is replaced by the Navigation Pane.) for the open database.
  2. On the File menu, point to Get External Data, and then click Import.
  3. In the Files Of Type box, make sure Microsoft Access (*.mdb; *.adp; *.mda; *.mde; *.ade) is selected.
  4. Click the arrow to the right of the Look In box, select the drive and folder where the Microsoft Access database (.mdb) (Microsoft Access database: A collection of data and objects (such as tables, queries, or forms) that is related to a particular topic or purpose.) or Microsoft Access project (.adp) (Microsoft Access project: An Access file that connects to a Microsoft SQL Server database and is used to create client/server applications. A project file doesn't contain any data or data-definition-based objects, such as tables and views.) that you want to import (import: To copy data from a text file, spreadsheet, or database table into an Access table. You can use the imported data to create a new table, or you can append (add) it to an existing table that has a matching data structure.) from is located, and then double-click the database's icon.
  5. In the Import Objects dialog box, click the tab for the kind of object that you want to import, and then click each object that you want to import, or click Select All to import all objects of the desired type. Repeat this step for each kind of object that you want to import.

To import just the tables' definitions (not the data that they contain), click Options, and then under Import Tables, click Definition Only.

To import select queries (select query: A query that asks a question about the data stored in your tables and returns a result set in the form of a datasheet, without changing the data.) as tables (for example, to create a read-only database), click Options, and then under Import Queries, click As Tables. Action queries (action query: A query that copies or changes data. Action queries include append, delete, make-table, and update queries. They are identified by an exclamation point (!) next to their names in the Navigation Pane.) import as queries no matter how this option is set.

To include relationships (relationship: An association that is established between common fields (columns) in two tables. A relationship can be one-to-one, one-to-many, or many-to-many.), custom menus and toolbars, or import/export specifications (import/export specification: A specification that stores the information that Access needs to run an import or export operation on a fixed-width or delimited text file.) (Access database only), click Options, and then, under Import, select the items you want included. Microsoft Access won't import a toolbar, menu bar, or shortcut menu if it has the same name as one in the Access file that you're importing to.

 
 
Applies to:
Access 2003