Format Property - Number and Currency Data Types

You can set the Format property to predefined number formats or custom number formats for the Number and Currency data types.

Setting

Predefined Formats

The following table shows the predefined Format property settings for numbers.

Setting Description
General Number (Default) Display the number as entered.
Currency Use the thousand separator (separator: A character that separates units of text or numbers.); follow the settings specified in the regional settings of Windows for negative amounts, decimal and currency symbols, and decimal places.
Euro Use the euro symbol (euro ), regardless of the currency symbol specified in the regional settings of Windows.
Fixed Display at least one digit; follow the settings specified in the regional settings of Windows for negative amounts, decimal and currency symbols, and decimal places.
Standard Use the thousand separator; follow the settings specified in the regional settings of Windows for negative amounts, decimal symbols, and decimal places.
Percent Multiply the value by 100 and append a percent sign (%); follow the settings specified in the regional settings of Windows for negative amounts, decimal symbols, and decimal places.
Scientific Use standard scientific notation.

Custom Formats

Custom number formats can have one to four sections with semicolons (;) as the list separator. Each section contains the format specification for a different type of number.

Section Description
First The format for positive numbers.
Second The format for negative numbers.
Third The format for zero values.
Fourth The format for Null (Null: A value you can enter in a field or use in expressions or queries to indicate missing or unknown data. In Visual Basic, the Null keyword indicates a Null value. Some fields, such as primary key fields, can't contain a Null value.) values.

For example, you could use the following custom Currency format:

$#,##0.00[Green];($#,##0.00)[Red];"Zero";"Null"
      

This number format contains four sections separated by semicolons and uses a different format for each section.

If you use multiple sections but don't specify a format for each section, entries for which there is no format will either display nothing or default to the formatting of the first section.

You can create custom number formats by using the following symbols.

Symbol Description
. (period) Decimal separator. Separators are set in the regional settings in Windows.
, (comma) Thousand separator.
0 Digit placeholder. Display a digit or 0.
# Digit placeholder. Display a digit or nothing.
$ Display the literal character "$".
% Percentage. The value is multiplied by 100 and a percent sign is appended.
E– or e– Scientific notation with a minus sign (–) next to negative exponents and nothing next to positive exponents. This symbol must be used with other symbols, as in 0.00E–00 or 0.00E00.
E+ or e+ Scientific notation with a minus sign (–) next to negative exponents and a plus sign (+) next to positive exponents. This symbol must be used with other symbols, as in 0.00E+00.

Remarks

You can use the DecimalPlaces property to override the default number of decimal places for the predefined format specified for the Format property.

The predefined currency and euro formats follow the settings in the regional settings of Windows. You can override these by entering your own currency format.

Example

The following are examples of the predefined number formats.

Setting Data Display
General Number 3456.789
–3456.789
$213.21
3456.789
–3456.789
$213.21
Currency 3456.789
–3456.789
$3,456.79
($3,456.79)
Fixed 3456.789
–3456.789
3.56645
3456.79
–3456.79
3.57
Standard 3456.789 3,456.79
Percent 3
0.45
300%
45%
Scientific 3456.789
–3456.789
3.46E+03
–3.46E+03

The following are examples of custom number formats.

Setting Description
0;(0);;"Null" Display positive values normally; display negative values in parentheses; display the word "Null" if the value is Null.
+0.0;–0.0;0.0 Display a plus (+) or minus (–) sign with positive or negative numbers; display 0.0 if the value is zero.
 
 
Applies to:
Access 2007