Create, join, or fix workgroup information files (MDB)

 Note   The information in this topic applies only to a Microsoft Access database (.mdb).

A Microsoft Access workgroup information file (workgroup information file: A file that Access reads at startup that contains information about the users in a workgroup. This information includes users' account names, their passwords, and the groups of which they are members.) stores information on members of a workgroup (workgroup: A group of users in a multiuser environment who share data and the same workgroup information file.), including user passwords. Access reads the workgroup information file when opening a database to determine who is allowed access to the objects in the database and what permissions (permissions: A set of attributes that specifies what kind of access a user has to data or objects in a database.) they have to those objects.

Create and join a workgroup information file

ShowCreate a new Microsoft Access workgroup information file

A Microsoft Access workgroup information file (workgroup information file: A file that Access reads at startup that contains information about the users in a workgroup. This information includes users' account names, their passwords, and the groups of which they are members.) contains a list of users who share data, also know as a workgroup (workgroup: A group of users in a multiuser environment who share data and the same workgroup information file.). Users' passwords are also stored in the workgroup information file. To control who has access to your database, you must create a new workgroup information file.

  1. Start Microsoft Access.
  2. On the Tools menu, point to Security, and then click Workgroup Administrator.
  3. In the Workgroup Administrator dialog box, click Create.
  4. In the Workgroup Owner Information dialog box, type your name and organization, and then type any combination of up to 20 numbers and letters for the workgroup ID (WID) (workgroup ID: A case-sensitive alphanumeric string that is 4 to 20 characters long and that you enter when creating a new workgroup information file by using the Workgroup Administrator. This uniquely identifies the Admin group for this workgroup file.).

Be sure to write down your exact name, organization, and workgroup ID — including whether letters are uppercase or lowercase (for all three entries) — and keep them in a secure place. If you have to re-create the workgroup information file, you must supply exactly the same name, organization, and workgroup ID. If you forget or lose these entries, you can't recover them and might lose access to your databases.

  1. Type a new name for the new workgroup information file. By default, the workgroup information file is saved in the language folder. To save in a different location, type a new path or click Browse to specify the new path.

The new workgroup information file is used the next time you start Microsoft Access. Any user (user account: An account identified by a user name and personal ID (PID) that is created to manage the user's permissions to access database objects in an Access workgroup.) and group accounts (group account: A collection of user accounts in a workgroup, identified by group name and personal ID (PID). Permissions assigned to a group apply to all users in the group.) or passwords that you create are saved in the new workgroup information file. To have others join the workgroup defined by your new workgroup information file, copy the file to a shared folder (if you didn't already save it in a shared folder in step 5), and then have each user run the Workgroup Administrator to join the new workgroup information file.

ShowJoin a Microsoft Access workgroup by using the Workgroup Administrator

 Important   If you are setting up user-level security (user-level security: When using user-level security in an Access database, a database administrator or an object's owner can grant individual users or groups of users specific permissions to tables, queries, forms, reports, and macros.) and need to make sure that your workgroup (workgroup: A group of users in a multiuser environment who share data and the same workgroup information file.) and its permissions (permissions: A set of attributes that specifies what kind of access a user has to data or objects in a database.) can't be duplicated, you should make sure the workgroup information file (workgroup information file: A file that Access reads at startup that contains information about the users in a workgroup. This information includes users' account names, their passwords, and the groups of which they are members.) that defines the workgroup you're joining has been created with a unique workgroup ID (WID (workgroup ID: A case-sensitive alphanumeric string that is 4 to 20 characters long and that you enter when creating a new workgroup information file by using the Workgroup Administrator. This uniquely identifies the Admin group for this workgroup file.)). If such a workgroup information file doesn't exist, you should create one.

  1. Start Microsoft Access.
  2. On the Tools menu, point to Security, and then click Workgroup Administrator.
  3. In the Workgroup Administrator dialog box, click Join.
  4. Type the path and name of the workgroup information file that defines the Microsoft Access workgroup you want to join, and then click OK, or click Browse and then use the Select Workgroup Information File dialog box to locate the workgroup information file.

The next time you start Microsoft Access, it uses the user (user account: An account identified by a user name and personal ID (PID) that is created to manage the user's permissions to access database objects in an Access workgroup.) and group accounts (group account: A collection of user accounts in a workgroup, identified by group name and personal ID (PID). Permissions assigned to a group apply to all users in the group.) and passwords stored in the workgroup information file for the workgroup you joined.

ShowSet up more than one workgroup to use the same security-enabled database

You can give users in different Microsoft Access workgroups (workgroup: A group of users in a multiuser environment who share data and the same workgroup information file.) access to a security-enabled database and its objects. This is useful if you want users at remote locations to manage their own workgroup membership.

  1. If necessary, use the Workgroup Administrator to join one of the workgroups.

ShowHow?

 Important   If you are setting up user-level security (user-level security: When using user-level security in an Access database, a database administrator or an object's owner can grant individual users or groups of users specific permissions to tables, queries, forms, reports, and macros.) and need to make sure that your workgroup (workgroup: A group of users in a multiuser environment who share data and the same workgroup information file.) and its permissions (permissions: A set of attributes that specifies what kind of access a user has to data or objects in a database.) can't be duplicated, you should make sure the workgroup information file (workgroup information file: A file that Access reads at startup that contains information about the users in a workgroup. This information includes users' account names, their passwords, and the groups of which they are members.) that defines the workgroup you're joining has been created with a unique workgroup ID (WID (workgroup ID: A case-sensitive alphanumeric string that is 4 to 20 characters long and that you enter when creating a new workgroup information file by using the Workgroup Administrator. This uniquely identifies the Admin group for this workgroup file.)). If such a workgroup information file doesn't exist, you should create one.

  1. Start Microsoft Access.
  2. On the Tools menu, point to Security, and then click Workgroup Administrator.
  3. In the Workgroup Administrator dialog box, click Join.
  4. Type the path and name of the workgroup information file that defines the Microsoft Access workgroup you want to join, and then click OK, or click Browse and then use the Select Workgroup Information File dialog box to locate the workgroup information file.

The next time you start Microsoft Access, it uses the user (user account: An account identified by a user name and personal ID (PID) that is created to manage the user's permissions to access database objects in an Access workgroup.) and group accounts (group account: A collection of user accounts in a workgroup, identified by group name and personal ID (PID). Permissions assigned to a group apply to all users in the group.) and passwords stored in the workgroup information file for the workgroup you joined.

  1. Exit Microsoft Access.
  2. Restart Access, open a database, and then log on as a workgroup administrator (a member of the Admins group (Admins group: The system administrator's group account, which retains full permissions on all databases used by a workgroup. The Setup program automatically adds the default Admin user account to the Admins group.)).
  3. Create a group account (group account: A collection of user accounts in a workgroup, identified by group name and personal ID (PID). Permissions assigned to a group apply to all users in the group.).

ShowHow?

As part of securing a database, you can create group accounts (group account: A collection of user accounts in a workgroup, identified by group name and personal ID (PID). Permissions assigned to a group apply to all users in the group.) in your Microsoft Access workgroup (workgroup: A group of users in a multiuser environment who share data and the same workgroup information file.) that you use to assign a common set of permissions (permissions: A set of attributes that specifies what kind of access a user has to data or objects in a database.) to multiple users.

To complete this procedure, you must be logged on as a member of the Admins group (Admins group: The system administrator's group account, which retains full permissions on all databases used by a workgroup. The Setup program automatically adds the default Admin user account to the Admins group.).

  1. Start Microsoft Access by using the workgroup in which you want to use the account.

 Important   The accounts you create for users must be stored in the workgroup information file (workgroup information file: A file that Access reads at startup that contains information about the users in a workgroup. This information includes users' account names, their passwords, and the groups of which they are members.) that those users will use. If you're using a different workgroup to create the database, change your workgroup before creating the accounts. You can change workgroups by using the Workgroup Administrator.

  1. Open a database.
  2. On the Tools menu, point to Security, and then click User And Group Accounts.
  3. On the Groups tab, click New.
  4. In the New User/Group dialog box, type the name of the new account and a personal ID (PID) (personal ID: A case-sensitive alphanumeric string that is 4 to 20 characters long and that Access uses in combination with the account name to identify a user or group in an Access workgroup.).

Be sure to write down the exact account name and PID, including whether letters are uppercase or lowercase, and keep them in a secure place. If you have to re-create an account that has been deleted or created in a different workgroup, you must supply the same name and PID entries. If you forget or lose these entries, you can't recover them.

 Note   A user account name cannot be same as an existing group account name, and visa versa.

  1. Click OK to create the new group account.

 Note   The PID entered in step 5 is not a password. Microsoft Access uses the PID and the user name as seeds for an encryption algorithm to generate an encrypted identifier for the user account (user account: An account identified by a user name and personal ID (PID) that is created to manage the user's permissions to access database objects in an Access workgroup.).

  1. Add users to the new group.

ShowHow?

To complete this procedure, you must be logged on as a member of the Admins group (Admins group: The system administrator's group account, which retains full permissions on all databases used by a workgroup. The Setup program automatically adds the default Admin user account to the Admins group.).

  1. Start Microsoft Access by using the workgroup (workgroup: A group of users in a multiuser environment who share data and the same workgroup information file.) that contains the user (user account: An account identified by a user name and personal ID (PID) that is created to manage the user's permissions to access database objects in an Access workgroup.) and group accounts (group account: A collection of user accounts in a workgroup, identified by group name and personal ID (PID). Permissions assigned to a group apply to all users in the group.).

You can find out which workgroup is current or change workgroups by using the Workgroup Administrator.

  1. Open the database.
  2. On the Tools menu, point to Security, and then click User And Group Accounts.
  3. On the Users tab, enter in the Name box the user you want to add to a group.
  4. In the Available Groups box, click the group you want to add the user to, and then click Add.

The selected group is displayed in the Member Of list.

  1. Repeat step 5 if you want to add this user to any other groups. Repeat steps 4 and 5 to add other users to groups.

 Note   You can add users to this group or delete them at any time.

  1. Repeat steps 1 through 5 for each workgroup that will share the same security-enabled database. In step 4, make sure to type exactly the same case-sensitive (case-sensitive: Capable of distinguishing between uppercase and lowercase letters. A case-sensitive search finds only text that is an exact match of uppercase and lowercase letters.) group name and personal ID (PID (personal ID: A case-sensitive alphanumeric string that is 4 to 20 characters long and that Access uses in combination with the account name to identify a user or group in an Access workgroup.)) as you did for the group account you created in the first workgroup.
  2. Open the security-enabled database you want to share between the workgroups and assign permissions (permissions: A set of attributes that specifies what kind of access a user has to data or objects in a database.) to the new groups.

ShowHow?

You can add or remove permissions (permissions: A set of attributes that specifies what kind of access a user has to data or objects in a database.) for an existing database and its objects, or you can set what permissions are used when you create new objects.

ShowAssign or remove permissions for a database and its objects

  1. Open the database.

The workgroup information file (workgroup information file: A file that Access reads at startup that contains information about the users in a workgroup. This information includes users' account names, their passwords, and the groups of which they are members.) in use when you log on must contain the user (user account: An account identified by a user name and personal ID (PID) that is created to manage the user's permissions to access database objects in an Access workgroup.) or group accounts (group account: A collection of user accounts in a workgroup, identified by group name and personal ID (PID). Permissions assigned to a group apply to all users in the group.) that you want to assign permissions for at this time; however, you can assign permissions (permissions: A set of attributes that specifies what kind of access a user has to data or objects in a database.) to groups and add users to those groups later.

  1. On the Tools menu, point to Security, and then click User And Group Permissions.
  2. On the Permissions tab, click Users or Groups, and then in the User/Group Name box, click the user or group that you want to assign permissions to.
  3. Click the type of object in the Object Type box, and then click the name of the object to assign permissions for in the Object Name box. Select multiple objects in the Object Name box by dragging through the objects you want to select, or by holding down CTRL and clicking the objects you want.

 Note   Hidden objects aren't displayed in the Object Name box unless you select Hidden objects on the View tab of the Options dialog box (Tools menu).

  1. Under Permissions, select the permissions you want to assign, or clear the permissions you want to remove for the group or user, and then click Apply. Repeat steps 4 and 5 to assign or remove permissions for additional objects for the current user or group.
  2. Repeat steps 3 through 5 for any additional users or groups.

 Notes 

  • Some permissions automatically imply the selection of others. For example, the Modify Data permission for a table automatically implies the Read Data and Read Design permissions because you need these to modify the data in a table. Modify Design and Read Data imply Read Design. For macros (macro: An action or set of actions that you can use to automate tasks.), Read Design implies Open/Run.
  • When you edit an object and save it, it retains its assigned permissions. However, if an object is saved with a new name, it is now a new object, and so has the default permissions defined for that object type rather than the permissions of the original object.

ShowAssign default permissions for new tables, queries, forms, reports, and macros

Default permissions can be assigned only by an administrator account (a member of the Admins group (Admins group: The system administrator's group account, which retains full permissions on all databases used by a workgroup. The Setup program automatically adds the default Admin user account to the Admins group.) in the workgroup (workgroup: A group of users in a multiuser environment who share data and the same workgroup information file.) in which the database that contains the object was created) or by the owner (owner: When security is being used, the user account that has control over a database or database object. By default, the user account that created a database or database object is the owner.) of the database.

  1. Open the database.
  2. On the Tools menu, point to Security, and then click User And Group Permissions.
  3. On the Permissions tab, click Users or Groups, and then in the User/Group Name box, click the user or group that you want to assign permissions to.
  4. Click the type of object in the Object Type box, and click <New object> in the Object Name list.
  5. Select the default permissions that you want to assign for that object type, and then click Apply. Repeat steps 4 and 5 to assign default permissions for additional object types for the current user or group.
  6. Repeat steps 3 through 5 for any additional users or groups, and then click OK when you have finished.

 Note   Some permissions automatically imply the selection of others. For example, the Modify Data permission for a table automatically implies the Read Data and Read Design permissions because you need these to modify the data in a table. Modify Design and Read Data imply Read Design. For macros (macro: An action or set of actions that you can use to automate tasks.), Read Design implies Open/Run.

 Note   You can also have a workgroup administrator at a remote location add the same group to his or her workgroup information file (workgroup information file: A file that Access reads at startup that contains information about the users in a workgroup. This information includes users' account names, their passwords, and the groups of which they are members.) by providing the administrator with the exact case-sensitive group name and PID you used to create that group in your workgroup information file.

Log on to a workgroup information file

ShowLog on to a Microsoft Access workgroup

The Logon box is displayed only if the logon procedure has been activated for your Microsoft Access workgroup (workgroup: A group of users in a multiuser environment who share data and the same workgroup information file.). Once the logon procedure has been activated, you must identify yourself at startup by entering a valid user account (user account: An account identified by a user name and personal ID (PID) that is created to manage the user's permissions to access database objects in an Access workgroup.) name. If a password has been added to a user account, you must also enter the password.

  1. Start Microsoft Access.
  2. If necessary, change to the workgroup that contains the user account you want to use to log on by using the Microsoft Access Workgroup Administrator.

ShowHow?

 Important   If you are setting up user-level security (user-level security: When using user-level security in an Access database, a database administrator or an object's owner can grant individual users or groups of users specific permissions to tables, queries, forms, reports, and macros.) and need to make sure that your workgroup (workgroup: A group of users in a multiuser environment who share data and the same workgroup information file.) and its permissions (permissions: A set of attributes that specifies what kind of access a user has to data or objects in a database.) can't be duplicated, you should make sure the workgroup information file (workgroup information file: A file that Access reads at startup that contains information about the users in a workgroup. This information includes users' account names, their passwords, and the groups of which they are members.) that defines the workgroup you're joining has been created with a unique workgroup ID (WID (workgroup ID: A case-sensitive alphanumeric string that is 4 to 20 characters long and that you enter when creating a new workgroup information file by using the Workgroup Administrator. This uniquely identifies the Admin group for this workgroup file.)). If such a workgroup information file doesn't exist, you should create one.

  1. Start Microsoft Access.
  2. On the Tools menu, point to Security, and then click Workgroup Administrator.
  3. In the Workgroup Administrator dialog box, click Join.
  4. Type the path and name of the workgroup information file that defines the Microsoft Access workgroup you want to join, and then click OK, or click Browse and then use the Select Workgroup Information File dialog box to locate the workgroup information file.

The next time you start Microsoft Access, it uses the user (user account: An account identified by a user name and personal ID (PID) that is created to manage the user's permissions to access database objects in an Access workgroup.) and group accounts (group account: A collection of user accounts in a workgroup, identified by group name and personal ID (PID). Permissions assigned to a group apply to all users in the group.) and passwords stored in the workgroup information file for the workgroup you joined.

  1. Open a database. If the logon procedure has been activated, the Logon box is displayed.
  2. Type your user account name in the Name box. Your user account name isn't case-sensitive (case-sensitive: Capable of distinguishing between uppercase and lowercase letters. A case-sensitive search finds only text that is an exact match of uppercase and lowercase letters.).
  3. If your password has been defined, type your password in the Password box; otherwise, leave it blank. Passwords are case-sensitive.

ShowModify a workgroup information file to require users to log on to Microsoft Access

When you help protect a database, you create user accounts (user account: An account identified by a user name and personal ID (PID) that is created to manage the user's permissions to access database objects in an Access workgroup.) in a Microsoft Access workgroup (workgroup: A group of users in a multiuser environment who share data and the same workgroup information file.), and then assign permissions (permissions: A set of attributes that specifies what kind of access a user has to data or objects in a database.) for the database and its objects to those user accounts and to any group accounts (group account: A collection of user accounts in a workgroup, identified by group name and personal ID (PID). Permissions assigned to a group apply to all users in the group.) to which they belong. Until you activate the logon procedure for a workgroup, Access automatically logs on all users at startup using the predefined Admin user account (Admin account: The default user account. When you install Access, the Setup program automatically includes the Admin user account in the workgroup information file that it creates.). If you want users to have only the permissions associated with their own accounts, you can have them log on by using their accounts. Users log on to Microsoft Access by typing a user name and password in the Logon dialog box.

  1. Join the workgroup whose logon procedure you want to activate.

ShowHow?

 Important   If you are setting up user-level security (user-level security: When using user-level security in an Access database, a database administrator or an object's owner can grant individual users or groups of users specific permissions to tables, queries, forms, reports, and macros.) and need to make sure that your workgroup (workgroup: A group of users in a multiuser environment who share data and the same workgroup information file.) and its permissions (permissions: A set of attributes that specifies what kind of access a user has to data or objects in a database.) can't be duplicated, you should make sure the workgroup information file (workgroup information file: A file that Access reads at startup that contains information about the users in a workgroup. This information includes users' account names, their passwords, and the groups of which they are members.) that defines the workgroup you're joining has been created with a unique workgroup ID (WID (workgroup ID: A case-sensitive alphanumeric string that is 4 to 20 characters long and that you enter when creating a new workgroup information file by using the Workgroup Administrator. This uniquely identifies the Admin group for this workgroup file.)). If such a workgroup information file doesn't exist, you should create one.

  1. Start Microsoft Access.
  2. On the Tools menu, point to Security, and then click Workgroup Administrator.
  3. In the Workgroup Administrator dialog box, click Join.
  4. Type the path and name of the workgroup information file that defines the Microsoft Access workgroup you want to join, and then click OK, or click Browse and then use the Select Workgroup Information File dialog box to locate the workgroup information file.

The next time you start Microsoft Access, it uses the user (user account: An account identified by a user name and personal ID (PID) that is created to manage the user's permissions to access database objects in an Access workgroup.) and group accounts (group account: A collection of user accounts in a workgroup, identified by group name and personal ID (PID). Permissions assigned to a group apply to all users in the group.) and passwords stored in the workgroup information file for the workgroup you joined.

  1. On the Tools menu, point to Security, and then click User And Group Accounts.
  2. Click the Users tab, and make sure that the predefined Admin user account is highlighted in the Name box.
  3. Click the Change Logon Password tab, and then type a new password in the New Password box. Don't type anything in the Old Password box.

ShowGuidelines for passwords

Use strong passwords that combine uppercase and lowercase letters, numbers, and symbols. Weak passwords don't mix these elements. Strong password: Y6dh!et5. Weak password: House27. Passwords should be 8 or more characters in length. A pass phrase that uses 14 or more characters is better. For more information, see Help protect your personal information with strong passwords.

It is critical that you remember your password. If you forget your password, Microsoft cannot retrieve it. Store the passwords that you write down in a secure place away from the information that they help protect.

User names can range from 1 to 20 characters, and can include alphabetic characters, accented characters, numbers, spaces, and symbols, with the following exceptions:

  • The characters " \ [ ] : | < > + = ; , . ? *
  • Leading spaces
  • Control characters (ASCII 10 through ASCII 31)

 Note   Passwords are case-sensitive (case-sensitive: Capable of distinguishing between uppercase and lowercase letters. A case-sensitive search finds only text that is an exact match of uppercase and lowercase letters.).

  1. Verify the password by typing it again in the Verify box, and then click OK.

The Logon dialog box is displayed the next time any member of the workgroup that you joined in step 2 starts Microsoft Access and opens a database. Each user will use the password created in step 5 to open the database. Once in the database, they will have the permissions assigned to their group or user accounts. If no user accounts are currently defined for that workgroup, the Admin user is the only valid account at this point.

ShowTurn off the Logon dialog box

If you don't need to establish different levels of permissions (permissions: A set of attributes that specifies what kind of access a user has to data or objects in a database.) for different groups of users, you can have Microsoft Access automatically log users on as the Admin user (Admin account: The default user account. When you install Access, the Setup program automatically includes the Admin user account in the workgroup information file that it creates.) in the Users group (Users group: The group account that contains all user accounts. Access automatically adds user accounts to the Users group when you create them.) with the permissions specified for that group. Users will not be required to enter their user name and password in the Logon dialog box when they open the database. Using this method, you can help protect any or all of the objects in a database. However, each user will have the same set of permissions. This does not remove user-level security (user-level security: When using user-level security in an Access database, a database administrator or an object's owner can grant individual users or groups of users specific permissions to tables, queries, forms, reports, and macros.) from the database.

  1. Join the workgroup (workgroup: A group of users in a multiuser environment who share data and the same workgroup information file.) that has the logon procedure that you want to deactivate.

ShowHow?

 Important   If you are setting up user-level security (user-level security: When using user-level security in an Access database, a database administrator or an object's owner can grant individual users or groups of users specific permissions to tables, queries, forms, reports, and macros.) and need to make sure that your workgroup (workgroup: A group of users in a multiuser environment who share data and the same workgroup information file.) and its permissions (permissions: A set of attributes that specifies what kind of access a user has to data or objects in a database.) can't be duplicated, you should make sure the workgroup information file (workgroup information file: A file that Access reads at startup that contains information about the users in a workgroup. This information includes users' account names, their passwords, and the groups of which they are members.) that defines the workgroup you're joining has been created with a unique workgroup ID (WID (workgroup ID: A case-sensitive alphanumeric string that is 4 to 20 characters long and that you enter when creating a new workgroup information file by using the Workgroup Administrator. This uniquely identifies the Admin group for this workgroup file.)). If such a workgroup information file doesn't exist, you should create one.

  1. Start Microsoft Access.
  2. On the Tools menu, point to Security, and then click Workgroup Administrator.
  3. In the Workgroup Administrator dialog box, click Join.
  4. Type the path and name of the workgroup information file that defines the Microsoft Access workgroup you want to join, and then click OK, or click Browse and then use the Select Workgroup Information File dialog box to locate the workgroup information file.

The next time you start Microsoft Access, it uses the user (user account: An account identified by a user name and personal ID (PID) that is created to manage the user's permissions to access database objects in an Access workgroup.) and group accounts (group account: A collection of user accounts in a workgroup, identified by group name and personal ID (PID). Permissions assigned to a group apply to all users in the group.) and passwords stored in the workgroup information file for the workgroup you joined.

  1. On the Tools menu, point to Security, and then click User And Group Accounts.
  2. Click the Users tab.
  3. In the Name box, select Admin from the list, and then click Clear Password.

The next time any member of the workgroup that you joined in step 1 starts Microsoft Access and opens a database, it will no longer display the Logon dialog box.

Restore or rebuild a workgroup information file

ShowRestore a damaged or deleted Microsoft Access workgroup information file

In rare circumstances, the Microsoft Access workgroup information file (workgroup information file: A file that Access reads at startup that contains information about the users in a workgroup. This information includes users' account names, their passwords, and the groups of which they are members.) can become damaged. If you start Microsoft Access and that file can't be opened, a message will be displayed. How you solve this problem depends on whether you have a backup copy and how your workgroup information file was originally created or specified. The following table summarizes how you should address each situation.

 Important   Microsoft Access stores security account information in the workgroup information file. So in all cases where you don't have a backup copy and have to re-create a workgroup information file, if you've restricted permissions (permissions: A set of attributes that specifies what kind of access a user has to data or objects in a database.) to your databases, you must re-create security accounts with the same case-sensitive (case-sensitive: Capable of distinguishing between uppercase and lowercase letters. A case-sensitive search finds only text that is an exact match of uppercase and lowercase letters.) names and personal ID (PID (personal ID: A case-sensitive alphanumeric string that is 4 to 20 characters long and that Access uses in combination with the account name to identify a user or group in an Access workgroup.)) entries as before.

 Note   You don't have to redefine permissions or object ownership because this information is stored in the security-enabled databases.

Used Workgroup Administrator Made backup copy Solution
No. Used default file created when installing Microsoft Access. No Re-start Microsoft Access and Microsoft Windows installer will re-create a default workgroup information file.
No. Used default file created when installing Microsoft Access. Yes Use Windows Explorer, My Computer, MS-DOS copy command, or backup software to copy the most recent copy of the file to the folder where you installed Microsoft Access.
Yes. Created a new file. No Run the Workgroup Administrator again, typing the same case-sensitive name, organization, and workgroup ID (WID) (workgroup ID: A case-sensitive alphanumeric string that is 4 to 20 characters long and that you enter when creating a new workgroup information file by using the Workgroup Administrator. This uniquely identifies the Admin group for this workgroup file.) entries you used when you originally created it.
Yes. Created a new file. Yes Copy or restore the backup copy to the path where you originally saved your workgroup information file.
Yes. Joined (specified) a file on a path other than the folder where Microsoft Access is installed. Yes Copy or restore the backup copy to the original path.
Yes. Joined (specified) a file on a path other than the folder where Microsoft Access is installed. No Create a new copy by using the method that was used to create the original file: re-start Microsoft Access so that installer will re-create a default workgroup information file, or run the Workgroup Administrator and type the same case-sensitive name, organization, and workgroup ID entries used when it was originally created.

ShowRebuild a workgroup information file from user and group names and IDs

If a workgroup information file (workgroup information file: A file that Access reads at startup that contains information about the users in a workgroup. This information includes users' account names, their passwords, and the groups of which they are members.) becomes damaged or has been deleted, and a backup copy isn't available, you can re-create the workgroup information file if you have the exact case-sensitive (case-sensitive: Capable of distinguishing between uppercase and lowercase letters. A case-sensitive search finds only text that is an exact match of uppercase and lowercase letters.) information that you used to create the file and define the accounts and groups in the file originally.

  1. Create a new workgroup information file, making sure to enter the exact case-sensitive name, company name, and workgroup ID (WID) (workgroup ID: A case-sensitive alphanumeric string that is 4 to 20 characters long and that you enter when creating a new workgroup information file by using the Workgroup Administrator. This uniquely identifies the Admin group for this workgroup file.) that you used to create the original file. Failure to re-enter the exact entries used to create the original file will create an invalid Admins group (Admins group: The system administrator's group account, which retains full permissions on all databases used by a workgroup. The Setup program automatically adds the default Admin user account to the Admins group.).

ShowHow?

A Microsoft Access workgroup information file (workgroup information file: A file that Access reads at startup that contains information about the users in a workgroup. This information includes users' account names, their passwords, and the groups of which they are members.) contains a list of users who share data, also know as a workgroup (workgroup: A group of users in a multiuser environment who share data and the same workgroup information file.). Users' passwords are also stored in the workgroup information file. To control who has access to your database, you must create a new workgroup information file.

  1. Start Microsoft Access.
  2. On the Tools menu, point to Security, and then click Workgroup Administrator.
  3. In the Workgroup Administrator dialog box, click Create.
  4. In the Workgroup Owner Information dialog box, type your name and organization, and then type any combination of up to 20 numbers and letters for the workgroup ID (WID) (workgroup ID: A case-sensitive alphanumeric string that is 4 to 20 characters long and that you enter when creating a new workgroup information file by using the Workgroup Administrator. This uniquely identifies the Admin group for this workgroup file.).

Be sure to write down your exact name, organization, and workgroup ID — including whether letters are uppercase or lowercase (for all three entries) — and keep them in a secure place. If you have to re-create the workgroup information file, you must supply exactly the same name, organization, and workgroup ID. If you forget or lose these entries, you can't recover them and might lose access to your databases.

  1. Type a new name for the new workgroup information file. By default, the workgroup information file is saved in the language folder. To save in a different location, type a new path or click Browse to specify the new path.

The new workgroup information file is used the next time you start Microsoft Access. Any user (user account: An account identified by a user name and personal ID (PID) that is created to manage the user's permissions to access database objects in an Access workgroup.) and group accounts (group account: A collection of user accounts in a workgroup, identified by group name and personal ID (PID). Permissions assigned to a group apply to all users in the group.) or passwords that you create are saved in the new workgroup information file. To have others join the workgroup defined by your new workgroup information file, copy the file to a shared folder (if you didn't already save it in a shared folder in step 5), and then have each user run the Workgroup Administrator to join the new workgroup information file.

  1. Re-create any group accounts (group account: A collection of user accounts in a workgroup, identified by group name and personal ID (PID). Permissions assigned to a group apply to all users in the group.), making sure to enter the exact case-sensitive group name and personal ID (PID (personal ID: A case-sensitive alphanumeric string that is 4 to 20 characters long and that Access uses in combination with the account name to identify a user or group in an Access workgroup.)) for each group.

ShowHow?

As part of securing a database, you can create group accounts (group account: A collection of user accounts in a workgroup, identified by group name and personal ID (PID). Permissions assigned to a group apply to all users in the group.) in your Microsoft Access workgroup (workgroup: A group of users in a multiuser environment who share data and the same workgroup information file.) that you use to assign a common set of permissions (permissions: A set of attributes that specifies what kind of access a user has to data or objects in a database.) to multiple users.

To complete this procedure, you must be logged on as a member of the Admins group (Admins group: The system administrator's group account, which retains full permissions on all databases used by a workgroup. The Setup program automatically adds the default Admin user account to the Admins group.).

  1. Start Microsoft Access by using the workgroup in which you want to use the account.

 Important   The accounts you create for users must be stored in the workgroup information file (workgroup information file: A file that Access reads at startup that contains information about the users in a workgroup. This information includes users' account names, their passwords, and the groups of which they are members.) that those users will use. If you're using a different workgroup to create the database, change your workgroup before creating the accounts. You can change workgroups by using the Workgroup Administrator.

  1. Open a database.
  2. On the Tools menu, point to Security, and then click User And Group Accounts.
  3. On the Groups tab, click New.
  4. In the New User/Group dialog box, type the name of the new account and a personal ID (PID) (personal ID: A case-sensitive alphanumeric string that is 4 to 20 characters long and that Access uses in combination with the account name to identify a user or group in an Access workgroup.).

Be sure to write down the exact account name and PID, including whether letters are uppercase or lowercase, and keep them in a secure place. If you have to re-create an account that has been deleted or created in a different workgroup, you must supply the same name and PID entries. If you forget or lose these entries, you can't recover them.

 Note   A user account name cannot be same as an existing group account name, and visa versa.

  1. Click OK to create the new group account.

 Note   The PID entered in step 5 is not a password. Microsoft Access uses the PID and the user name as seeds for an encryption algorithm to generate an encrypted identifier for the user account (user account: An account identified by a user name and personal ID (PID) that is created to manage the user's permissions to access database objects in an Access workgroup.).

  1. Re-create each user account (user account: An account identified by a user name and personal ID (PID) that is created to manage the user's permissions to access database objects in an Access workgroup.), making sure to enter the exact case-sensitive user name and PID for each user.

ShowHow?

To complete this procedure, you must be logged on as a member of the Admins group (Admins group: The system administrator's group account, which retains full permissions on all databases used by a workgroup. The Setup program automatically adds the default Admin user account to the Admins group.).

 Note   It is usually easier to manage security if you organize users into groups, and then assign permissions (permissions: A set of attributes that specifies what kind of access a user has to data or objects in a database.) to groups rather than to individual users.

  1. Start Microsoft Access by using the workgroup (workgroup: A group of users in a multiuser environment who share data and the same workgroup information file.) in which you want to use the account.

 Important   The accounts you create for users must be stored in the workgroup information file (workgroup information file: A file that Access reads at startup that contains information about the users in a workgroup. This information includes users' account names, their passwords, and the groups of which they are members.) that those users will use. If you're using a different workgroup to create the database, change your workgroup before creating the accounts.

  1. Open a database.
  2. On the Tools menu, point to Security, and then click User And Group Accounts.
  3. On the Users tab, click New.
  4. In the New User/Group dialog box, type the name of the new account and a personal ID (PID) (personal ID: A case-sensitive alphanumeric string that is 4 to 20 characters long and that Access uses in combination with the account name to identify a user or group in an Access workgroup.), and then click OK to create the new account, which is automatically added to the Users group (Users group: The group account that contains all user accounts. Access automatically adds user accounts to the Users group when you create them.).

Be sure to write down the exact account name and PID, including whether letters are uppercase or lowercase, and keep them in a secure place. If you ever have to re-create an account that has been deleted or created in a different workgroup, you must supply the same name and PID entries. If you forget or lose these entries, you can't recover them.

 Notes 

  1. If you saved the new workgroup information file to a new name or location in step 1, tell other users in the workgroup (workgroup: A group of users in a multiuser environment who share data and the same workgroup information file.) to use the Workgroup Administrator to join the new workgroup information file.
 
 
Applies to:
Access 2003