Convert an Access file

 Important   You should back up a Microsoft Access file (Microsoft Access file: A database or project file. In Access 2007, database objects and data are stored in .accdb files. Earlier versions use.mdb files. An Access project file doesn't contain data, and is used to connect to a SQL Server database.) before you convert it.

ShowConvert a previous-version Access file to Microsoft Access 2000 or Access 2002 - 2003 file format

You can convert a Microsoft Access database (Microsoft Access database: A collection of data and objects (such as tables, queries, or forms) that is related to a particular topic or purpose.) from Access 2.0 or later to Access 2000 or Access 2002 - 2003 file format. You can also convert an Access project (Microsoft Access project: An Access file that connects to a Microsoft SQL Server database and is used to create client/server applications. A project file doesn't contain any data or data-definition-based objects, such as tables and views.) from Access 2000 file format to Access 2002 - 2003 file format.

  1. If possible, compile the Microsoft Access file you're going to convert — this reduces the possibility of errors during conversion.

You can open and compile an Access 2000 file in Access 2002 or later. However, if the file is an Access database created in Access 97 or earlier, you must do this in the previous version.

ShowHow?

  1. Close the Microsoft Access file you're going to convert. If the file is a multiuser (multiuser (shared) database: A database that permits more than one user to access and modify the same set of data at the same time.) Access database located on a server or in a shared folder, make sure that no one else has it open.
  2. In Access 2002 or later, do one of the following:

ShowConvert an Access database from Access 97 or earlier to the default file format (Access 2000 or Access 2002 - 2003)

  1. On the File menu, click Open Button image.
  2. Click a shortcut in the left side of the Open dialog box, or in the Look in box, click the drive or folder that contains the Access file that you want.
  3. In the folder list, double-click folders until you open the folder that contains the database. If you can't find the database that you want to open, click Tools on the toolbar in the Open dialog box, and then click Search Button image. In the Search dialog box, enter additional search criteria.
  4. Double-click the file you want to open.
  5. In the Convert/Open Database dialog box, click Convert database.

ShowConvert a previous-version Access file to the file format you specify

  1. Make a backup copy of the Microsoft Access file (Microsoft Access file: A database or project file. In Access 2007, database objects and data are stored in .accdb files. Earlier versions use.mdb files. An Access project file doesn't contain data, and is used to connect to a SQL Server database.) you're going to convert.
  2. If possible, compile the Access file in the previous version of Access. This reduces the possibility of errors during conversion.
  3. Close the Access file. If the file is a multiuser (multiuser (shared) database: A database that permits more than one user to access and modify the same set of data at the same time.) Access database (Microsoft Access database: A collection of data and objects (such as tables, queries, or forms) that is related to a particular topic or purpose.) located on a server or in a shared folder, make sure that no one else has it open.
  4. Start Access.
  5. On the Tools menu, point to Database Utilities, point to Convert Database, and then click the file format you want for the new file.
  6. In the Database To Convert From dialog box, select the database you want to convert and then click Convert.
  7. In the Convert Database Into dialog box, do one of the following:
    • Type a name for the new file.
    • Select a different location for the new file. (You can keep the same name, or change it.)

You cannot convert an Access database into a file with the same name and location as the original database.

  1. Click Save.

Notes

  • When you convert a previous-version Microsoft Access database that has linked tables (linked table: A table stored in a file outside the open database from which Access can access records. You can add, delete, and edit records in a linked table, but you cannot change its structure.), make sure that the external tables are in the same folder that they were originally in. If Microsoft Access can't find the tables that are linked to a database that's being converted, you won't be able to use the converted database. Once you convert the Access database, you can move these tables and use the Linked Table Manager to re-link them. Converting a database that has tables linked to it does not convert the linked tables.
  • You can also convert a previous-version Access database by importing its database objects into a new Access 2000 or later database. You can use this method if you don't want all of the objects in the previous-version database to exist in the Access 2000 database. When you convert a database by importing its database objects, you don't automatically import references to libraries, and you might need to reset those references in the new Access file.
  • When you convert an Access 2000 file that contains data access pages, Access does not automatically convert the pages. However, when you open a data access page in Design view, Access converts it to use the most recent version of the Microsoft Office Web Components and creates a backup copy of the original page. You can use the backup copy if you want to revert to the Microsoft Office 2000 Web Components.

ShowConvert an Access file to a previous version

You can convert a Microsoft Access database (Microsoft Access database: A collection of data and objects (such as tables, queries, or forms) that is related to a particular topic or purpose.) in Access 2000 or Access 2002 - 2003 file format back to Access 97. You can also convert an Access database or an Access project (Microsoft Access project: An Access file that connects to a Microsoft SQL Server database and is used to create client/server applications. A project file doesn't contain any data or data-definition-based objects, such as tables and views.) in Access 2002 - 2003 file format back to Access 2000 file format.

  1. Open the Microsoft Access file that you want to convert. If it is a multiuser (multiuser (shared) database: A database that permits more than one user to access and modify the same set of data at the same time.) Access database that is located on a server or in a shared folder, make sure that no one else has it open.

 Important   If you have employed the security features of the Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) code, you must supply the password before you convert the file by clicking Code Button image on the Database toolbar and entering the password in the databasename Password dialog box.

If you are converting a security-enabled Access database, you must have Open/Run and Open Exclusive permissions for the database itself, and Read Design permissions for all objects in the database. To help protect a database that has been converted to Access 97, you must open it in Access 97 and apply user-level security (user-level security: When using user-level security in an Access database, a database administrator or an object's owner can grant individual users or groups of users specific permissions to tables, queries, forms, reports, and macros.).

  1. On the Tools menu, point to Database Utilities, click Convert Database/Project, and then click the file format you want.
  2. In the Convert Database Into dialog box, type the name of the new previous-version database that you want to create in the File name box, and then click Save.
  3. If the database that you are converting to Access 97 contains code, open the new database in Access 97, open a module and click References on the Tools menu, and in the Available References box, clear the check boxes next to any missing references and set a reference to the Microsoft Access DAO 3.51 Object Library.

If the Access database uses add-ins (add-in: A supplemental program that adds custom commands or custom features to Microsoft Office.) or library databases (library database: A collection of procedures and database objects that you can call from any application. In order to use the items in the library, you must first establish a reference from the current database to the library database.), you must convert them back to Access 97 as well.

ShowConvert a security-enabled database from Access 95 or 97 to Access 2000 or Access 2002 - 2003 file format

After upgrading from Microsoft Access 95 or 97, you must convert your security-enabled Access database (Microsoft Access database: A collection of data and objects (such as tables, queries, or forms) that is related to a particular topic or purpose.), but you don't need to convert the workgroup information file (workgroup information file: A file that Access reads at startup that contains information about the users in a workgroup. This information includes users' account names, their passwords, and the groups of which they are members.) to use it with Microsoft Access 2000. However, you should compact the workgroup information file before using it. The following procedure doesn't apply to an Access project, because its security is maintained in the Microsoft SQL Server database (Microsoft SQL Server database: A database that consists of tables, views, indexes, stored procedures, functions, and triggers. You can connect your database to SQL Server data by using ODBC or by creating an Access project (*.adp) file.) that the project is connected to.

  1. Convert the security-enabled Access database.

ShowHow?

  1. Make a backup copy of the Microsoft Access file (Microsoft Access file: A database or project file. In Access 2007, database objects and data are stored in .accdb files. Earlier versions use.mdb files. An Access project file doesn't contain data, and is used to connect to a SQL Server database.) you're going to convert.
  2. If possible, compile the Access file in the previous version of Access. This reduces the possibility of errors during conversion.
  3. Close the Access file. If the file is a multiuser (multiuser (shared) database: A database that permits more than one user to access and modify the same set of data at the same time.) Access database (Microsoft Access database: A collection of data and objects (such as tables, queries, or forms) that is related to a particular topic or purpose.) located on a server or in a shared folder, make sure that no one else has it open.
  4. Start Access.
  5. On the Tools menu, point to Database Utilities, point to Convert Database, and then click the file format you want for the new file.
  6. In the Database To Convert From dialog box, select the database you want to convert and then click Convert.
  7. In the Convert Database Into dialog box, do one of the following:
    • Type a name for the new file.
    • Select a different location for the new file. (You can keep the same name, or change it.)

You cannot convert an Access database into a file with the same name and location as the original database.

  1. Click Save.
  1. In Access 2002 or later, open the new Access database, and then compact it by pointing to Database Utilities on the Tools menu and clicking Compact and Repair Database.
  2. Close the Access database and temporarily join a different workgroup information information (.mdw) file than the one that is used with the security-enabled database.

ShowHow?

 Important   If you are setting up user-level security (user-level security: When using user-level security in an Access database, a database administrator or an object's owner can grant individual users or groups of users specific permissions to tables, queries, forms, reports, and macros.) and need to make sure that your workgroup (workgroup: A group of users in a multiuser environment who share data and the same workgroup information file.) and its permissions (permissions: A set of attributes that specifies what kind of access a user has to data or objects in a database.) can't be duplicated, you should make sure the workgroup information file (workgroup information file: A file that Access reads at startup that contains information about the users in a workgroup. This information includes users' account names, their passwords, and the groups of which they are members.) that defines the workgroup you're joining has been created with a unique workgroup ID (WID (workgroup ID: A case-sensitive alphanumeric string that is 4 to 20 characters long and that you enter when creating a new workgroup information file by using the Workgroup Administrator. This uniquely identifies the Admin group for this workgroup file.)). If such a workgroup information file doesn't exist, you should create one.

  1. Start Microsoft Access.
  2. On the Tools menu, point to Security, and then click Workgroup Administrator.
  3. In the Workgroup Administrator dialog box, click Join.
  4. Type the path and name of the workgroup information file that defines the Microsoft Access workgroup you want to join, and then click OK, or click Browse and then use the Select Workgroup Information File dialog box to locate the workgroup information file.

The next time you start Microsoft Access, it uses the user (user account: An account identified by a user name and personal ID (PID) that is created to manage the user's permissions to access database objects in an Access workgroup.) and group accounts (group account: A collection of user accounts in a workgroup, identified by group name and personal ID (PID). Permissions assigned to a group apply to all users in the group.) and passwords stored in the workgroup information file for the workgroup you joined.

If another workgroup information file doesn't exist, you might have to create one first.

ShowHow?

A Microsoft Access workgroup information file (workgroup information file: A file that Access reads at startup that contains information about the users in a workgroup. This information includes users' account names, their passwords, and the groups of which they are members.) contains a list of users who share data, also know as a workgroup (workgroup: A group of users in a multiuser environment who share data and the same workgroup information file.). Users' passwords are also stored in the workgroup information file. To control who has access to your database, you must create a new workgroup information file.

  1. Start Microsoft Access.
  2. On the Tools menu, point to Security, and then click Workgroup Administrator.
  3. In the Workgroup Administrator dialog box, click Create.
  4. In the Workgroup Owner Information dialog box, type your name and organization, and then type any combination of up to 20 numbers and letters for the workgroup ID (WID) (workgroup ID: A case-sensitive alphanumeric string that is 4 to 20 characters long and that you enter when creating a new workgroup information file by using the Workgroup Administrator. This uniquely identifies the Admin group for this workgroup file.).

Be sure to write down your exact name, organization, and workgroup ID — including whether letters are uppercase or lowercase (for all three entries) — and keep them in a secure place. If you have to re-create the workgroup information file, you must supply exactly the same name, organization, and workgroup ID. If you forget or lose these entries, you can't recover them and might lose access to your databases.

  1. Type a new name for the new workgroup information file. By default, the workgroup information file is saved in the language folder. To save in a different location, type a new path or click Browse to specify the new path.
  2. Click OK.

The new workgroup information file is used the next time you start Microsoft Access. Any user (user account: An account identified by a user name and personal ID (PID) that is created to manage the user's permissions to access database objects in an Access workgroup.) and group accounts (group account: A collection of user accounts in a workgroup, identified by group name and personal ID (PID). Permissions assigned to a group apply to all users in the group.) or passwords that you create are saved in the new workgroup information file. To have others join the workgroup defined by your new workgroup information file, copy the file to a shared folder (if you didn't already save it in a shared folder in step 5), and then have each user run the Workgroup Administrator to join the new workgroup information file.

  1. Quit and then restart Access.
  2. Compact the workgroup information file that was used with the security-enabled database by pointing to Database Utilities on the Tools menu and clicking Compact and Repair Database.
  3. Tell users to run Workgroup Administrator and join the compacted workgroup information file before opening the security-enabled database.

ShowConvert a workgroup information file to Access 2000 or Access 2002 - 2003 file format

You do not need to convert a Microsoft Access 2000 workgroup information file (workgroup information file: A file that Access reads at startup that contains information about the users in a workgroup. This information includes users' account names, their passwords, and the groups of which they are members.) to Access 2002 or later. However, to take advantage of security and performance improvements, you should re-create workgroup information files from Access 97 or earlier as described below.

  1. Create a new workgroup information file, making sure to enter the exact, case-sensitive name, company name, and workgroup ID (workgroup ID: A case-sensitive alphanumeric string that is 4 to 20 characters long and that you enter when creating a new workgroup information file by using the Workgroup Administrator. This uniquely identifies the Admin group for this workgroup file.) that was used to create the original file. Failure to re-enter the exact entries that were used to create the original file will create an invalid Admins group (Admins group: The system administrator's group account, which retains full permissions on all databases used by a workgroup. The Setup program automatically adds the default Admin user account to the Admins group.).

ShowHow?

A Microsoft Access workgroup information file (workgroup information file: A file that Access reads at startup that contains information about the users in a workgroup. This information includes users' account names, their passwords, and the groups of which they are members.) contains a list of users who share data, also know as a workgroup (workgroup: A group of users in a multiuser environment who share data and the same workgroup information file.). Users' passwords are also stored in the workgroup information file. To control who has access to your database, you must create a new workgroup information file.

  1. Start Microsoft Access.
  2. On the Tools menu, point to Security, and then click Workgroup Administrator.
  3. In the Workgroup Administrator dialog box, click Create.
  4. In the Workgroup Owner Information dialog box, type your name and organization, and then type any combination of up to 20 numbers and letters for the workgroup ID (WID) (workgroup ID: A case-sensitive alphanumeric string that is 4 to 20 characters long and that you enter when creating a new workgroup information file by using the Workgroup Administrator. This uniquely identifies the Admin group for this workgroup file.).

Be sure to write down your exact name, organization, and workgroup ID — including whether letters are uppercase or lowercase (for all three entries) — and keep them in a secure place. If you have to re-create the workgroup information file, you must supply exactly the same name, organization, and workgroup ID. If you forget or lose these entries, you can't recover them and might lose access to your databases.

  1. Type a new name for the new workgroup information file. By default, the workgroup information file is saved in the language folder. To save in a different location, type a new path or click Browse to specify the new path.
  2. Click OK.

The new workgroup information file is used the next time you start Microsoft Access. Any user (user account: An account identified by a user name and personal ID (PID) that is created to manage the user's permissions to access database objects in an Access workgroup.) and group accounts (group account: A collection of user accounts in a workgroup, identified by group name and personal ID (PID). Permissions assigned to a group apply to all users in the group.) or passwords that you create are saved in the new workgroup information file. To have others join the workgroup defined by your new workgroup information file, copy the file to a shared folder (if you didn't already save it in a shared folder in step 5), and then have each user run the Workgroup Administrator to join the new workgroup information file.

  1. Re-create any group accounts, making sure to enter the exact, case-sensitive group name and personal ID (PID (personal ID: A case-sensitive alphanumeric string that is 4 to 20 characters long and that Access uses in combination with the account name to identify a user or group in an Access workgroup.)) for each group.

ShowHow?

As part of securing a database, you can create group accounts (group account: A collection of user accounts in a workgroup, identified by group name and personal ID (PID). Permissions assigned to a group apply to all users in the group.) in your Microsoft Access workgroup (workgroup: A group of users in a multiuser environment who share data and the same workgroup information file.) that you use to assign a common set of permissions (permissions: A set of attributes that specifies what kind of access a user has to data or objects in a database.) to multiple users.

To complete this procedure, you must be logged on as a member of the Admins group (Admins group: The system administrator's group account, which retains full permissions on all databases used by a workgroup. The Setup program automatically adds the default Admin user account to the Admins group.).

  1. Start Microsoft Access by using the workgroup in which you want to use the account.

 Important   The accounts you create for users must be stored in the workgroup information file (workgroup information file: A file that Access reads at startup that contains information about the users in a workgroup. This information includes users' account names, their passwords, and the groups of which they are members.) that those users will use. If you're using a different workgroup to create the database, change your workgroup before creating the accounts. You can change workgroups by using the Workgroup Administrator.

  1. Open a database.
  2. On the Tools menu, point to Security, and then click User And Group Accounts.
  3. On the Groups tab, click New.
  4. In the New User/Group dialog box, type the name of the new account and a personal ID (PID) (personal ID: A case-sensitive alphanumeric string that is 4 to 20 characters long and that Access uses in combination with the account name to identify a user or group in an Access workgroup.).

Be sure to write down the exact account name and PID, including whether letters are uppercase or lowercase, and keep them in a secure place. If you have to re-create an account that has been deleted or created in a different workgroup, you must supply the same name and PID entries. If you forget or lose these entries, you can't recover them.

 Note   A user account name cannot be same as an existing group account name, and visa versa.

  1. Click OK to create the new group account.

 Note   The PID entered in step 5 is not a password. Microsoft Access uses the PID and the user name as seeds for an encryption algorithm to generate an encrypted identifier for the user account (user account: An account identified by a user name and personal ID (PID) that is created to manage the user's permissions to access database objects in an Access workgroup.).

  1. Re-create each user account, making sure to enter the exact, case-sensitive user name and PID for each user.

ShowHow?

To complete this procedure, you must be logged on as a member of the Admins group (Admins group: The system administrator's group account, which retains full permissions on all databases used by a workgroup. The Setup program automatically adds the default Admin user account to the Admins group.).

 Note   It is usually easier to manage security if you organize users into groups, and then assign permissions (permissions: A set of attributes that specifies what kind of access a user has to data or objects in a database.) to groups rather than to individual users.

  1. Start Microsoft Access by using the workgroup (workgroup: A group of users in a multiuser environment who share data and the same workgroup information file.) in which you want to use the account.

 Important   The accounts you create for users must be stored in the workgroup information file (workgroup information file: A file that Access reads at startup that contains information about the users in a workgroup. This information includes users' account names, their passwords, and the groups of which they are members.) that those users will use. If you're using a different workgroup to create the database, change your workgroup before creating the accounts.

  1. Open a database.
  2. On the Tools menu, point to Security, and then click User And Group Accounts.
  3. On the Users tab, click New.
  4. In the New User/Group dialog box, type the name of the new account and a personal ID (PID) (personal ID: A case-sensitive alphanumeric string that is 4 to 20 characters long and that Access uses in combination with the account name to identify a user or group in an Access workgroup.), and then click OK to create the new account, which is automatically added to the Users group (Users group: The group account that contains all user accounts. Access automatically adds user accounts to the Users group when you create them.).

Be sure to write down the exact account name and PID, including whether letters are uppercase or lowercase, and keep them in a secure place. If you ever have to re-create an account that has been deleted or created in a different workgroup, you must supply the same name and PID entries. If you forget or lose these entries, you can't recover them.

 Notes 

ShowConvert a security-enabled database from Access 2.0 to Access 2000 or Access 2002 - 2003 file format

  1. Convert the security-enabled database.

ShowHow?

  1. Make a backup copy of the Microsoft Access file (Microsoft Access file: A database or project file. In Access 2007, database objects and data are stored in .accdb files. Earlier versions use.mdb files. An Access project file doesn't contain data, and is used to connect to a SQL Server database.) you're going to convert.
  2. If possible, compile the Access file in the previous version of Access. This reduces the possibility of errors during conversion.
  3. Close the Access file. If the file is a multiuser (multiuser (shared) database: A database that permits more than one user to access and modify the same set of data at the same time.) Access database (Microsoft Access database: A collection of data and objects (such as tables, queries, or forms) that is related to a particular topic or purpose.) located on a server or in a shared folder, make sure that no one else has it open.
  4. Start Access.
  5. On the Tools menu, point to Database Utilities, point to Convert Database, and then click the file format you want for the new file.
  6. In the Database To Convert From dialog box, select the database you want to convert and then click Convert.
  7. In the Convert Database Into dialog box, do one of the following:
    • Type a name for the new file.
    • Select a different location for the new file. (You can keep the same name, or change it.)

You cannot convert an Access database into a file with the same name and location as the original database.

  1. Click Save.
  1. Convert the workgroup information file (typically named system.mda) that is used with the security-enabled database by following the previous procedure.
  2. Tell users to run Workgroup Administrator and join the compacted workgroup information file before opening the security-enabled database.

ShowHow?

 Important   If you are setting up user-level security (user-level security: When using user-level security in an Access database, a database administrator or an object's owner can grant individual users or groups of users specific permissions to tables, queries, forms, reports, and macros.) and need to make sure that your workgroup (workgroup: A group of users in a multiuser environment who share data and the same workgroup information file.) and its permissions (permissions: A set of attributes that specifies what kind of access a user has to data or objects in a database.) can't be duplicated, you should make sure the workgroup information file (workgroup information file: A file that Access reads at startup that contains information about the users in a workgroup. This information includes users' account names, their passwords, and the groups of which they are members.) that defines the workgroup you're joining has been created with a unique workgroup ID (WID (workgroup ID: A case-sensitive alphanumeric string that is 4 to 20 characters long and that you enter when creating a new workgroup information file by using the Workgroup Administrator. This uniquely identifies the Admin group for this workgroup file.)). If such a workgroup information file doesn't exist, you should create one.

  1. Start Microsoft Access.
  2. On the Tools menu, point to Security, and then click Workgroup Administrator.
  3. In the Workgroup Administrator dialog box, click Join.
  4. Type the path and name of the workgroup information file that defines the Microsoft Access workgroup you want to join, and then click OK, or click Browse and then use the Select Workgroup Information File dialog box to locate the workgroup information file.

The next time you start Microsoft Access, it uses the user (user account: An account identified by a user name and personal ID (PID) that is created to manage the user's permissions to access database objects in an Access workgroup.) and group accounts (group account: A collection of user accounts in a workgroup, identified by group name and personal ID (PID). Permissions assigned to a group apply to all users in the group.) and passwords stored in the workgroup information file for the workgroup you joined.

ShowConvert a previous-version replica set to Access 2000 or Access 2002 - 2003 file format

Take a conservative approach when converting a replica set. It's important that you do not synchronize (synchronization: The process of updating two members of a replica set by exchanging all updated records and objects in each member. Two replica set members are synchronized when the changes in each have been applied to the other.) the test Design Master (Design Master: The only member of the replica set in which you can make changes to the database structure that can be propagated to other replicas.) and replicas (replica: A copy of a database that is a member of a replica set and can be synchronized with other replicas in the set. Changes to the data in a replicated table in one replica are sent and applied to the other replicas.) you create by following these procedures with members of your working replica set (replica set: The Design Master and all replicas that share the same database design and unique replica set identifier.). Otherwise, unintended changes to your data or the structure of your working replica set might occur.

Caution

  1. If you are converting to Access 2000 file format, make sure that all users who will access the replica set have installed Access 2000 or later. If you are converting to Access 2002 - 2003 file format, make sure that all users who will access the replica set have installed Access 2002 or later.
  2. Make a copy of the current Design Master that is still in the file format of the earlier version of Access, and put the copy on a different computer or isolate it completely from any other members of the replica set.
  3. In the previous version of Access, make the isolated copy the new Design Master by pointing to Replication on the Tools menu and then clicking Recover Design Master.

If you are converting from Access 97 or earlier, you must recover the Design Master in the previous version of Access.

  1. Create some replicas based on the new Design Master.
  2. On the Tools menu, point to Database Utilities, and then click Convert Database to convert the new Design Master to Microsoft Access 2000 or later.

If you are converting from Access 97 or earlier, repeat this step for each new replica in your replica set. Replicas in Access 2000 or Access 2002 - 2003 file format cannot synchronize with Access 95 or Access 97 replicas.

  1. Synchronize the new converted Design Master with the new replicas.
  2. Run any tests you'd like to try.

If you want to change some objects, you can either make the changes again in the original Design Master after it is converted, or keep the copy around long enough to import the changed objects from it.

  1. After you are satisfied that the copy works, delete the new Design Master and all of its replicas.
  2. Convert the original Design Master to the newer version of Microsoft Access.

If you are converting from Access 97 or earlier, convert all of the original replicas.

  1. Synchronize the replicas.

After you convert a replica set from Microsoft Access 97 or earlier to Access 2000 or later, you can't open the replicas in the previous version of Access.

 
 
Applies to:
Access 2003