ASCII character chart

Applies to
2003 version of the following Microsoft Office programs: Access 2003,
Excel 2003, FrontPage® 2003, InfoPath™ 2003, OneNote® 2003,
Outlook® 2003, PowerPoint® 2003, Project 2003, Publisher 2003,
Visio® 2003, and Word 2003

2002 version of the following Microsoft Office programs: Access 2002,
Excel 2002, FrontPage® 2002, Outlook® 2002, PowerPoint® 2002,
Project 2002, Publisher 2002, Visio® 2002, and Word 2002

Numbers are the language of computers. So how does your computer use the alphabet to communicate with programs and other computers? One way is by converting a character set (character set: A grouping of alphabetic, numeric, and other characters that have some relationship in common. For example, the standard ASCII character set includes letters, numbers, symbols, and control codes that make up the ASCII coding scheme.) into a numeric representation.

In the 1960s, a need for standardization led to American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) (ASCII: Code representing characters in the English language as numbers. Each character is assigned a number from 0 to 127. Most computers use ASCII to represent text and to transfer data from one computer to another.) (pronounced ask-kee). The ASCII chart contains 128 numbers assigned to corresponding characters (character: A letter, number, punctuation mark, or symbol.). ASCII provides a way that computers can store and exchange data with other computers and programs.

ASCII-formatted text contains no formatting information such as bold, italic, or fonts. When you use Microsoft Notepad or save a file as plain text in Microsoft Office Word, ASCII is used. You might have read an advertisement for a job opening where the employer asked for resumes in ASCII format. This means whether you send your resume in an e-mail message, fax, or as a printed copy, the employer wants your resume to contain no special style formatting. Large companies might scan resumes and ASCII-formatted text works well with Optical Character Recognition (OCR) (OCR: Translates images of text, such as scanned documents, into actual text characters. Also known as text recognition.) scanning software.

Insert an ASCII character into a document

 Note   This feature requires Excel, FrontPage, InfoPath, OneNote, Outlook, PowerPoint, Project, Publisher, Word, or Visio.

In addition to typing a character on your keyboard, you can also use the character code of the symbol as a keyboard shortcut. For example, to insert the degree symbol, press and hold down ALT while typing 0176 on the numeric keypad.

  • To insert an ASCII character from the charts below, press and hold down ALT while typing the decimal numeric equivalent.

For example, to insert the degree symbol, press and hold down ALT while typing 0176 on the numeric keypad.

 Note   You must use the numeric keypad to type the numbers and not the keyboard. Make sure that the NUM LOCK key is on if your keyboard requires it to type numbers on the numeric keypad.

ASCII printing characters

Numbers 32–126 are assigned to characters that you would find on your keyboard and appear when you view or print a document. Number 127 represents the DELETE command.

ShowASCII printing characters chart

Decimal Character Decimal Character
32 space 80 P
33 ! 81 Q
34 " 82 R
35 # 83 S
36 $ 84 T
37 % 85 U
38 & 86 V
39 ' 87 w
40 ( 88 X
41 ) 89 Y
42 * 90 Z
43 + 91 [
44 , 92 \
45 - 93 ]
46 . 94 ^
47 / 95 _
48 0 96 `
49 1 97 a
50 2 98 b
51 3 99 c
52 4 100 d
53 5 101 e
54 6 102 f
55 7 103 g
56 8 104 h
57 9 105 i
58 : 106 j
59 ; 107 k
60 < 108 l
61 = 109 m
62 > 110 n
63 ? 111 o
64 @ 112 p
65 A 113 q
66 B 114 r
67 C 115 s
68 D 116 t
69 E 117 u
70 F 118 v
71 G 119 w
72 H 120 x
73 I 121 y
74 J 122 z
75 K 123 {
76 L 124 |
77 M 125 }
78 N 126 ~
79 O 127 DEL

Extended ASCII printing characters

Extended ASCII characters meet the demand for more characters. Extended ASCII includes the 128 characters found in ASCII (numbers 0–32 appear in a following chart), and adds an additional 128 characters for 256 total. Even with these additional characters, many languages contain symbols that could not be condensed into 256 characters. Because of this, there are variants of ASCII to encompass regional characters and symbols.

For example, the ASCII table also known as ISO 8859-1 is used by many software programs for languages in North America, Western Europe, Australia, and Africa.

ShowExtended ASCII printing characters chart

Decimal Character Decimal Character
128 Ç 192
129 ü 193
130 é 194
131 â 195
132 ä 196
133 à 197
134 å 198
135 ç 199
136 ê 200
137 ë 201
138 è 202
139 ï 203
140 î 204
141 ì 205
142 Ä 206
143 Å 207
144 É 208
145 æ 209
146 Æ 210
147 ô 211
148 ö 212 Ô
149 ò 213
150 û 214
151 ù 215
152 ÿ 216
153 Ö 217
154 Ü 218
155 ¢ 219
156 £ 220
157 ¥ 221
158 222
159 ƒ 223
160 á 224 α
161 í 225 ß
162 ó 226 Γ
163 ú 227 π
164 ñ 228 Σ
165 Ñ 229 σ
166 ª 230 µ
167 º 231 τ
168 ¿ 232 Φ
169 233 Θ
170 ¬ 234 Ω
171 ½ 235 δ
172 ¼ 236
173 ¡ 237 φ
174 « 238 ε
175 » 239
176 240
177 241 ±
178 242
179 243
180 244
181 245
182 246 ÷
183 247
184 248
185 249
186 250 ·
187 251
188 252
189 253 ²
190 254
191 255  

ASCII non-printing control characters

Numbers 0–31 on the ASCII table are assigned for control characters that are used to control some peripheral devices such as printers. For example, 12 represents the form feed/new page function. This command instructs a printer to skip to the top of the next page.

ShowASCII non-printing control characters chart

Decimal Character Decimal Character
0 null 16 data link escape
1 start of heading 17 device control 1
2 start of text 18 device control 2
3 end of text 19 device control 3
4 end of transmission 20 device control 4
5 inquiry 21 negative acknowledge
6 acknowledge 22 synchronous idle
7 bell 23 end of transmission block
8 backspace 24 cancel
9 horizontal tab 25 end of medium
10 line feed/new line 26 substitute
11 vertical tab 27 escape
12 form feed/new page 28 file separator
13 carriage return 29 group separator
14 shift out 30 record separator
15 shift in 31 unit separator

Beyond ASCII

Another, newer table of characters is called Unicode (Unicode: A character encoding standard developed by the Unicode Consortium. By using more than one byte to represent each character, Unicode enables almost all of the written languages in the world to be represented by using a single character set.). Because Unicode is a much larger table, it can represent 65,536 characters instead of the 128 of ASCII or 256 of extended ASCII. This larger capacity allows most characters of different languages to be included in one character set.

 
 
Applies to:
Access 2003, Excel 2003, FrontPage 2003, InfoPath 2003, OneNote 2003, Outlook 2003, PowerPoint 2003, Publisher 2003, Word 2003