About charts

Charts are visually appealing and make it easy for users to see comparisons, patterns, and trends in data. In Microsoft Access, you can create charts in a form, report, or data access page. You can also display a datasheet or form in PivotChart view (PivotChart view: A view that shows a graphical analysis of data in a datasheet or form. You can see different levels of detail or specify the layout by dragging fields and items or by showing and hiding items in the drop-down lists for the fields.).

A doughnut chart comparing tax revenues over two years

ShowCharts in a form or report

In a form or report, you can use Microsoft Graph to create a chart linked to data from the available tables, queries (query: A question about the data stored in your tables, or a request to perform an action on the data. A query can bring together data from multiple tables to serve as the source of data for a form or report.), or other record sources (record source: The underlying source of data for a form, report, or data access page. In an Access database, it could be a table, query, or SQL statement. In an Access project, it could be a table, view, SQL statement, or stored procedure.). The charts can be global (including all data) or record-bound (reflecting data only from the current record, in which case the chart updates as you move from record to record).

Several chart types, including two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) types, are available for you to choose from. Formatting options include adding text and graphics to the charts, changing colors, and adding trendlines and error bars.

ShowCharts in a data access page

You can use Microsoft Office Chart (a Microsoft Office Web Component) to create dynamic, interactive charts in a data access page that you can then make available on the Web. For example, you can create a chart by using data in a table that stores sales figures. When you update the sales figures, the chart updates — so users can always see the latest information on their Web pages.

You can create a chart in a page by using data from tables or queries, or from a Spreadsheet Component (Spreadsheet Component: A Microsoft Office Web Component that provides the interactive functionality of a spreadsheet on a Web page.You can enter data, add formulas and functions, apply filters, change formatting, and recalculate.) or PivotTable list (PivotTable list: A Microsoft Office Web Component that is used to analyze data interactively on a Web page. Data displayed in a row and column format can be moved, filtered, sorted, and calculated in ways that are meaningful for your audience.). You can choose from a variety of chart types in which you can add text, change colors, and take advantage of other formatting options, such as adding trendlines and error bars.

You can also modify a chart in a page that was published as an interactive chart from Microsoft Excel. When you publish an interactive chart in Excel, the data for the chart is published with it as a Spreadsheet Component or PivotTable list. For more information about publishing charts from Excel, see Microsoft Excel Help.

Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.01 with Service Pack 2 (SP2) or later is required to create a chart on a page.

ShowPivotChart view of a datasheet or form

In an Access database (Microsoft Access database: A collection of data and objects (such as tables, queries, or forms) that is related to a particular topic or purpose.) or Access project (Microsoft Access project: An Access file that connects to a Microsoft SQL Server database and is used to create client/server applications. A project file doesn't contain any data or data-definition-based objects, such as tables and views.), you can display a datasheet or form that contains sales figures as a dynamic, interactive chart in PivotChart view. PivotChart view automatically uses Microsoft Office Chart (a Microsoft Office Web Component) to display the chart. In PivotChart view, you can choose from a variety of chart types in which you can add text, change colors, and take advantage of other formatting options, such as adding trendlines and error bars.

 
 
Applies to:
Access 2003