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Shapes II: Expertly position, stack, and group shapes

Test yourself

Complete the following test so you can be sure you understand the material. Your answers are private, and test results are not scored.


Why might you want to specify a stacking order for shapes?

To show a sideways view of how boxes are stacked in a storeroom.

To show relationships by placing shapes in front of or behind each other.

So that you can number shapes in a specific sequence.

So that you can arrange the shapes in an even and orderly fashion.

How do you move a shape to the back of the order?

On the Shape menu, click Lay Out Shapes, and then click Shallow or Deep for the Depth option.

On the Shape menu, point to Order, and then click Send to Back.

On the Format menu, click Behavior, and then click Send to Back.

On the Shape menu, click Operations, and then click Send to Back.

You add a square to the page, then a circle, and then a triangle. Which shape will be on the top of the stacking order?

The square; since it was added first, it wins.

The triangle; since it was added last, it wins.

The circle; because it doesn't have any corners, it wins.

The smallest shape; because it mustn't be covered, it wins.

You add a square to the page, then a circle, and then a triangle. Finally, you move the square to one side. Now the square is at the top of the stacking order.

True. The square was touched last, and it will now be in the front of the order.

False. The triangle remains at the top because it was added to the page last.

If you send a shape to the back, and it disappears, what should you do?

Click an empty area of the page. On the Shape menu, click Order, and then click Bring Forward.

Click an empty area of the page. On the Shape menu, click Order, and then click Bring to Front.

Keep the shape selected. On the Shape menu, click Order, and then click Bring Forward.

Keep the shape selected. On the Shape menu, click Order, and then click Send Backward.

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